Tag Archives: cider

1899: Vintage Herefordshire Apples, and “French sorts”

Rackham Pomona

A committee composed of members of the Herefordshire Fruit-Growers’ Association and of the Fruit and Chrysanthemum Society was appointed in 1899 to make a selection of vintage apples and pears best suited to Herefordshire and the districts adjoining.

The following is the list drawn up by the committee:

The Apples:

Old Foxwhelp 
Cherry Pearmain
Cowarne Red
Dymock Red
Eggleton Styre
Kingston Black or Black Taunton
Skyrme’s Kernel
Spreading Redstreak
Carrion Apple
Cherry Norman
Cummy Norman
Royal Wilding
Handsome Norman
Strawberry Norman
White Bache or Norman
Broad-leaved Norman
 
and
 
Argile Grise
Bramtot
De Boutville
Frequin Audievre
Medaille d’Or
 
These last five being “French sorts” introduced from Normandy about 1880, and now established in the orchards of Herefordshire.

Adapted from an online version of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica – Article: CIDER, or CYDER (from the Fr. cidre, derived from the Lat. sicera or cisera, Gr. mucepa, Heb. shade, strong drink)

Read more here: CIDER, or CYDER 

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Harvest Times

All images are from The Library of Congress. 4 are from the collection of Harris & Ewing, photographers, and the image of apple picking in Berkeley County, West Virginia is by Smith Brothers.

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Deadline Bean Town. 3 Cider Taste-Off Results. A Report from Outpost Boston.

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From Our Boston Outpost:

Some time ago our intrepid Bean Town Cider Correspondent led a cider tasting somewhere in wilds of greater Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Tasters were a diverse batch –  ranging in age from just-legal whippersnappers, to seasoned imbibers. Of the assembled tasters a select few were cider-philes, most had only a glancing familiarity with our favorite pome fruit beverage, and some were completely cider-unaware, having no idea what to expect from a fermented apple elixir.

Ciders were selected based on local availability.

The Cider Contenders:

Bantam WUNDERKIND of Massachusetts

Fatty Bampkins DRY hailing from Maine

Vermont Cider Co. FARMHOUSE No. 91 

The 3 ciders were presented, glasses filled and the tasters let loose.

Our correspondent placed paper and pen by each cider bottle, and the testers jotted anonymous notes as they tasted.

Real people drinking actual ciders. Here is what they had to say:

Bantam WUNDERKIND Tasting Comments:

“The champagne of ciders!”

“Light, a wee sharp upfront, (illegible), like sparkling wine.”

“Likey!”

“Very sweet”

“Good body, nice aftertaste. A little too sweet.”

“Good with Food/Meal.”

“Sweet & tasty, makes me want a donut.”

“NICE!”

“More like apple juice.  Sweet & crisp but blends well.”

“Good sparkle & flavor. Has mellow apple flavor.”

Fatty Bampkins DRY Tasting Comments:

“faint apple taste”

“Light/Fresh, Refreshing – Not Much Flavor”

“Very Adult. – DRY.”

“Too TARTE”

“slight pickle scent??”

“No me gusta tambien. Very vinegary, not much apple flavor”

Vermont Cider Co. FARMHOUSE No. 91 Tasting Comments:

“sweet apple taste (heart).”

“Like soda-pop. Tastes like apples. (On purpose?)”

“delicious. very sweet. would prefer it to be a little more bubbly!”

“Flat but could be tasty otherwise.”

“Perfect for tweens.”

“Lacks effervescence, a bit sweet, but could be good in a cocktail!”

“Not enough effervescence for me, but the flavor is smooth.”

“Did I just drink alcohol? Pretty sure it was juice.”

The Consensus: Local craft cider Bantam WUNDERKIN is hands down favorite at this informal Boston cider tasting.

The Take Away:

1. We believe there is a cider for everyone.

2. How to find YOUR ciders?  Taste Testing. Extensive Taste Testing.

3. Cider Tasting is More Fun in Groups. Cider knowledge shared while tasting is enjoyable, and informal, casual tastings brings out the best in most ciders, and certainly results in some interesting comments.

4. If you like cider and want to share the cider joy, an informal tasting like this is a good way to introduce your cider-curious friends to the wonderful world of cider.

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Cider Review: Eve’s Cidery BECKHORN HOLLOW DRY CIDER: Cider52

Trained&PrunedAppleTree

Cider: BECKHORN HOLLOW DRY CIDER

Maker: Eve’s Cidery   Origin:  Van Etten, New York

website: www.evescidery.com

ABV: 8%   Bottle: 750 ml

Makers Style/Bottle Notes: “Naturally sparkling cider, fermented in this bottle”.

Fruit: Apple  Cider Maker:  Autumn Stoscheck

Our Tasting Notes: First glass, drinking at about 52 degrees.

In The Glass:  Clear, pale, white-gold with a small, steady bead that settles to no visible bubble. 

Aroma: Apple peel, marzipan, honey, raw apple, baked apple, grassy, powdered sugar, citrus peel and spice.

Taste: Tart, sweet, slightly spirituous and warming, with stone fruit, dried apricot, and anise & fennel.

Overall Impressions: Refreshing with pleasing tart acidity, balanced by sweet, sour, and subtle bitter notes. Intend to taste this cider again if we can find – it’s a special blend – we discovered ours at Eve’s Cidery’s New York GrowNYC Greenmarket stall at Union Square. This cider is currently not listed on Eve’s Cidery’s website.

BONUS MIXOLOGY TIP: Eve’s Cidery Beckhorn Hollow Dry Cider with a splash of Eden Ice Cider Orleans Bitter is delicious and tremendously refreshing. Makes an easy apéritif or the start of an interesting cocktail.

Watch an informative video about Eve’s Cidery’s orcharding practices: Orcharding with Autumn from Eve’s Cidery on Vimeo.

Eve’s Ciderywww.evescidery.com

Find Eve’s Cidery’s stall at the GrowNYC Union Square Greenmarket www.grownyc.org:  Friday MapSaturday Map.

Eden Ice Ciders: www.edenicecider.com

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Oh, Ithaca! A Very Moist City. 1921.

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The Cornell Daily Sun

Volume XLII, Number 4, 24 September 1921

MANUFACTURERS OF CIDER TOLD TO GET PERMITS

Federal Inspector Lays Down Law to Makers of the Beverage.

ITHACA VERY MOIST CITY

Official Claims More Liquor Here Than in Other Towns of Same Size.

REGULATIONS ON VINEGAR

Cannot Be Manufactured Without Having Bonds and Taking Legal Steps.

“There Is more liquor in Ithaca than in any other city of its size in New York State, according to a statement made by the federal director,” declared Jay Carpenter when he returned yesterday afternoon from a short trip to Syracuse. Mr. Carpenter, who was accompanied by E. J. Holmes, said that they had received instructions from the “district prohibition agent that neither they nor any other cider manufacturers in Tompkins county would be permitted to make any more cider unless they first obtained a federal permit and then gave a guarantee that the cider would never become sour. The official also informed his visitors that the federal agents have Ithaca in mind for another visit in the near future. It Is understood the interest of the federal enforcement bureau was drawn to Ithaca due to the large sales of hard cider which have been made in this city. Mr. Holmes and Mr. Carpenter, both of whom manufacture clder on an extensive scale, were cited to appear before the federal director in ‘Syracuse on Thursday. They were ‘ Turned that they had no right to manufacture cider without a permit and that if they obtain a permit they must absolutely guarantee that the cider would not turn sour. Mr. Carpenter maintained that, although his cider is pasteurized before it is sold, he cannot guarantee it will not become sour. The federal director informed the Itathacans that they could obtain permission to manufacture vinegar by filing a $2,000 bond and taking other necessary legal steps.

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Windfalls: Found Apple Poems, A Selection.

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– – –
 
Api Panache
 
 
(Panachee).
 
Yellowish green,
 
 
round-ish, small,
 
indifferent;
 
 
October to December ;
 
 
more curious than useful.
 
– – –
 
Bedfordshire Foundling
 
 
(Cambridge Pippin). –
 
Yellow, roundish, oblong, large, kitchen,
 
 
first-rate ;  
 
 
November to March ;
 
 
very handsome, large and ex-cellent.
 
 
Bennet.
 
 
Greenish red, ovate,
 
 
middle-sized,
 
 
cider ;
 
 
November to December ;
 
 
a bitter-sweet. 
 
 
 
 
 

The Gardener”s Monthly Volume.

The Apple

It’s Culture, Uses, and History

1847

by George William Johnson & R. Errington

via googlebooks

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Come All Ye Cider Drinkers And Join In The Wassail!

 

When is Wassail? We suggest observing North American Wassail celebrations from January 5th to  January 17th, 2014.*

Wassail is an informal collaborative effort of interested cider-drinkers in North America (and beyond).

Goals for the 2014 Wassail: Explore Old & New World Wassail Traditions, Salute The Orchard, Honor The Apple and Celebrate With Cider!

How Can You Wassail? It’s Easy! Enjoy cider and a wassail bowl with friends, visit an orchard, cidermaker or local cider-serving establishment and toast the orchard & the apple, or host a Wassail event of your own.

Let us know if you’re planning an event – we’ll post it on the Wassail 2014 page.

Share your Wassailing plans and pictures. Post, tweet, tumble and instagram The Wassail!

* We’re considering Wassailing all the way through January. Why not?!

 

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A Bit About Wassailing.

The Wassail (Charles Rennie Mackintosh)About Wassailing From the National Association of Cider Makers:

“Wassailing is the chief custom associated with cider apple trees. The word wassail is derived from the Anglo Saxon ‘wes hal’ meaning ‘good health’ or ‘be whole’. The earliest written records of wassailing date from the late 17th century.

This custom is performed to protect the trees from evil spirits and to make them bear a plentiful crop and is still carried out in the West of England. The rite involves five main elements: gathering around an apple tree, singing the Wassailing song, pouring cider over the tree’s roots, loud noises and a toast.

The pouring of cider over the roots symbolised the carrying forward of the life juice of the tree from one year to the next. It was also the custom to place a cider-soaked piece of toasted bread in the fork of the tree to attract good spirits while guns were fired into the trees so as to frighten away the evil spirits. The health of the tree would then be drunk as often as was felt necessary. Nowadays, it is traditional to hold the rite on Twelfth Night.

Over time, the custom was adapted and added to, so that each area had its own variation. The date for instance varied, and old tea kettles and tin trays might be clattered together to scare away the spirits instead of firing guns. In Herefordshire it was traditional for Morris Men to take part by dancing around the trees.”

Source: National Association of Cider Makers.

Link: www.cideruk.com

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Views from New Amsterdam Winter Market 2013

Images of floral beauty taken at the stall of, and garland making demonstration lead by, Emily Thompson of Emily Thompson Flowers www.emilythompsonflowers.com

Thank You to Rowan Imports for cider, and to Sterling Publishing, Countryman Press, Storey Publishing, Timber Press, Ten Speed Press, Chelsea Green Publishing, Johns Hopkins University Press, and Running Press for all the wonderful books included in our raffle gift baskets for the November & December Markets. Thank You All for helping us support New Amsterdam Market and share the cider joy.

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Events: NYC: New Amsterdam Winter Market and 8th Anniversary Celebration

New Amsterdam Market Winter Market & 8th Anniversary is December 15, 2013.

“Featuring over 60 regional food artisans, purveyors, market fare and handcrafted goods. From holiday wreaths, garlands, tools and ornaments for home decor to holiday treats, latkes, sweets, baked goods and gifts.”

To celebrate New Amsterdam Market’s 8th Anniversary we coordinated 3 amazing gift baskets (for yourself or for gift giving) containing some of our favorite books AND some terrific ciders. Support the Market with a raffle ticket or two, and you could be the lucky winner of one of these swell books & cider baskets.

Each basket comes with a selection of ciders of the world donated by Rowan Imports.

Cider Enthusiasts Selection:

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Books: Worlds Best Ciders by Pete Brown and Bill Bradshaw, Sterling Publishing, 2013

Cider Hard & Sweet by Ben Watson, Countryman Press, 3rd Edition, 2013 and

Cider: Making, Using & Enjoying Sweet & Hard Cider, 3rd Edition by Lew Nichols, Annie Proulx, Storey Publishing, 3rd Edition

Apple & Cider Aficionados Selection:

Books: Worlds Best Ciders by Pete Brown and Bill Bradshaw, Sterling, 2013 and

Apples of North America: 192 Exceptional Varieties for Gardeners, Growers, and Cooks by Tom Burford, Timber Press, 2013.

NYC Food Culture Selection:

Books: I Love New York: Ingredients and Recipes by Daniel Humm, Will Guidara, Ten Speed Press, 2013 and

New York a la Cart: Recipes and Stories from the Big Apple’s Best Food Trucks by Siobhan Wallace and Alexandra Penfold, Running Press; 2013.

Celebrate 8 years of New Amsterdam Market, and support the revival of the historic Old Fulton Fish Market.

Links:

New Amsterdam Market newamsterdammarket.org

Rowan Imports rowanimports.com

 

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Mixology: The Buffalo Gold Cocktail. Brookville Restaurant, Charlottesville, Virginia.

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Virginia Pippin Gold Cider (with Virginia apple brandy) Meet Kentucky’s Buffalo Trace Bourbon.

Virginia knows how to make a cider cocktail. One of our favorites, (enjoyed with Brookville’s deliciously addicting bacon fat popcorn):

The Cocktail: The Buffalo Gold.

The Venue: Brookville Restaurant, Charlottesville, Virginia.
The Cider: Foggy Ridge Cider Pippin Gold.
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The recipe is as follows:
Iced highball glass
1 1/2 oz. Buffalo Trace Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey
1 1/2 oz Foggy Ridge Cider Pippin Gold
long squeeze grenadine
Fill with your favorite ginger ale
Garnish with a cherry
 
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Foggy Ridge Cider Makers Tasting Notes for Pippin Gold:
Pippin Gold is a unique blend of 100% Newtown Pippin hard cider and apple brandy from Laird and Company, the country’s oldest distiller. Pippin Gold is delicious as a dessert cider or sweet apéritif. Some have swooned over peaches soaked in Pippin Gold served with homemade pound cake.
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Links:
Brookville Restaurant: www.brookvillerestaurant.com
Foggy Ridge Cider: www.foggyridgecider.com
Laird & Company: www.lairdandcompany.com
Buffalo Trace Distillery: www.buffalotracedistillery.com
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Image: Malus domestica: Yellow Newtown. Charlottesville, Virginia, 1904.
Artist: Deborah Griscom Passmore
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705
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Celebrate Repeal Day®: Drink a Cider.

Repeal Day® Is December 5.

The motto:

The Freedom To Celebrate. Celebrate The Freedom.

Read more about Repeal Day®  and suggested activities at www.repealday.org

We Suggest A Fine Way To Celebrate Repeal Day®: Drink a Cider.

Read the fascinating Analysis of the U. S. Liquor Industry during Prohibition originally published in Fortune Magazine: U.S. Liquor Industry (Fortune 1931)

Suggested Accompaniment: A Glass of Cider.

alcohol_classic

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Cider is one of the good gifts which are to be received with thanksgiving.

WPA October

We therefore believe that cider is one of the good gifts which are to be received with thanksgiving; and we desire to see its manufacture so perfected, that it will rank with wine in public estimation: and if our experience can add to the stock of information on this subject, we cheerfully give it, though we may encounter the reprobation of some ultra abstinence, not to say, temperance men.

From: Tilton’s Journal of Horticulture, Volume 5, J. E. Tilton & Company, 1869.

To read more about Cider and Cider-Manufacture, see Tilton’s Journal of Horticulture, Volume 5.

WPA November

Image credit:  October. Leslie Bryan Burroughs. [1938]. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, WPA Poster Collection, Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-7683.

November. Ben Kaplan. [1938]. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, WPA Poster Collection, Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-7684.

 

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Celebrate the New York Cider Revival and Win Your Own Cider Library!

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It’s The 3rd Annual Cider Revival at the New Amsterdam Market in New York City Sunday, November 24.

Visit The New York State Cider & Thanksgiving Market for a chance to win Your Own Cider Library AND Support The New Amsterdam Market.

Enter to win an amazing Cider Research & Reference Library – several publishers have generously donated some terrific books – perfect for the cider & apple lover or the cider curious. For yourself or for gift giving.

WAIT There’s MORE!

The Cider Research & Reference Library includes a few bottles of real New York cider!

Stop by the main Market table on Sunday Nov. 24th, and enter to win The Cider Library with Libations! Tickets $5 each or $10 for 3. Such value! and for a good cause.

All proceeds to benefit The New Amsterdam Market.

Take a look at the books included in the Cider (and Apple) Research & Reference Library:

Cider Hard & Sweet: History, Traditions, and Making Your Own 3rd Edition by Ben Watson, The Countryman Press, 2013.

Cider Hard & Sweet

Taste, Memory: Forgotten Foods, Lost Flavors, and Why They Matter by David Buchanan, Chelsea Green Publishing, 2012.

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The New Cider Makers Handbook: A Comprehensive Guide for Craft Producers by Claude Jolicoeur, Chelsea Green Publishing, 2013.

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The Drunken Botanist by Amy Stewart, Algonquin Books, 2013.

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Worlds Best Ciders by Pete Brown & Bill Bradshaw, Sterling Epicure, 2013.

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Apples of North America: 192 Exceptional Varieties for Gardeners, Growers, and Cooks by Tom Burford, Timber Press, 2013.

True Brews: How to Craft Fermented Cider, Beer, Wine, Sake, Soda, Mead, Kefir, and Kombucha at Home by Emma Christensen, 10 Speed Press, 2013.

True Brews Cover

Johnny Appleseed And The American Orchard: A Cultural History by William Kerrigan, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012.

johnny-appleseed-cover2

Apple Lovers Cookbook by Amy Traverso, W. W. Norton & Company, 2011.

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Cider Handbook from Scott Labs, 2013.

Scott 2013-14

Stop by the New Amsterdam Market this Sunday, November 24th, to celebrate the New York Cider Revival, enter to win this swell cider library, and get your holiday marketing done.

Link: newamsterdammarket.com

Directions: newamsterdammarket.com/map.html

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Celebrate The 3rd Annual New York Cider Revival at The New Amsterdam Market

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It’s The 3rd Annual New York Cider Revival at the New Amsterdam Market in New York City this Sunday, November 24, 2013 from 11AM – 5PM.

Visit The New York State Cider & Thanksgiving Market for A Chance to Win Your Own Cider Library AND Support The New Amsterdam Market.

Several New York Cidermakers will be in attendance, including: Blackbird CidersBreezy Hill OrchardDocs Hard CiderOrchard Hill Cider Mill and Sovereign Cider. Meet The Cidermakers & enjoy some cider. See the full list of vendors at The New Amsterdam Market website here.

Link: newamsterdammarket.com

Directions: newamsterdammarket.com/map.html

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A Cider And Apple Stand On The Lee Highway, Shenandoah National Park, Virginia 1935

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Photographer: Rothstein, Arthur – United States. Resettlement Administration

Credit Line: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection, [reproduction number, LC-DIG-fsa-8a07722 (digital file from original neg.) LC-USF33-T01-002196-M3 (b&w film dup. neg., 70mm size) LC-USF3301-002196-M3 (b&w film dup. neg., 4×5 size)]

For more Virginia Cider 2013 Visit: CIDER WEEK VA ciderweekva.com

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Cider Mixology: The Whiskey Smash! Millstone Cellars Blossom Cider in A Woodberry Kitchen Cocktail

WK Wiskey Smash!

Cider Mixology: Whiskey Smash!  Millstone Cellars Blossom Cider at Woodberry Kitchen.

Wending our way back to New York from Virginia – with precious cider cargo in tow – we stopped for refreshment at Woodberry Kitchen, located in a refurbished 19th century mill complex outside of downtown Baltimore. 

Woodberry Kitchen bar artisans embrace the charms of cider, allowing us to start the evening properly with a cider cocktail, The Whisky Smash! 

Mixologist C. Connor Rasmussen, kindly shared the recipe.

The WHISKEY SMASH! How To:

A wonderful cocktail wherein we substitute the more traditional bubbly wine for the sparkling cider:
1.75 bourbon (above 90 proof)
.75 lemon (fresh squeezed)
.5 honey syrup (89% honey to water)
Shake everything up and pour over rocks with a dash of bitters and top with the sparkling cider!
Garnish with a fresh rosemary sprig.
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To Start: The Whiskey Smash! and yellow wax peppers on toasts charred in the wood-fired brick oven.
To Follow: An extremely delicious and seriously local meal.
Accompanied By: Regional ciders at every turn.
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Read a bit about Woodberry Kitchen (here).

For another cider cocktail from Woodberry Kitchen, with MIllstone Ciderberry Cider, see The Brewer & Keep Cocktail.

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SNAPSHOT: 50 STATES OF CIDER: VIRGINIA

Trained&PrunedAppleTree

50 STATES OF CIDER: Ciderland USA: VIRGINIA

Includes Makers of Cider, Perry, Fruit Wines, Meads, and Ice Ciders.

Last updated November 24, 2013.

Have an addition, correction or found a broken link?  Leave a comment or send us an email.

VIRGINIA CIDER MAKERS (8):

Cider Makers of Virginia:

A

Albemarle Ciderworks North Garden, VA

B

Blue Bee Cider  Richmond, VA

Bold Rock Cider Nellysford, VA

C

Castle Hill Cider  Free Union, VA

F

Foggy Ridge Cider Dugspur, VA

O

Old Hill Cider  Timberville, VA

P

Potter’s Craft Cider Free Union, VA

W

Winchester Ciderworks Winchester, VA

EVENTS:

Cider Week Virginia  November 15 – 24, 2013

Link: ciderweekva.com

Please visit the individual cider makers websites to see what events they have scheduled throughout the year.

RESOURCES:

Websites:

Vintage Virginia Apples

Urban Homestead

Virginia Tech Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station Virginia Tech – click this LINK to explore various cider and apple related materials including downloadable pdfs.

Virginia Cooperative Extension 

Books: 

Apples of North America: 192 Exceptional Varieties for Gardeners, Growers, and Cooks by Tom Burford, Timber Press 2013.

Old Southern Apples. A Comprehensive History and Description of Varieties for Collectors, Growers, and Fruit Enthusiasts by Creighton Lee Calhoun, Jr., Chelsea Green 2011.

VIRGINIA APPLE & CIDER FACTS:

Virginia apple country includes the mountainous region of the northern Shenandoah Valley through the Roanoke Valley, the rich countryside of Albemarle and Rappahannock counties and the southwest counties of Patrick and Carroll. The majority of apples trees are grown in the Shenandoah Valley. 1

Virginia is the number 6 state in commercial apple production. 2

Famed Virginia apples included the Ablemarle Pippin (also known as the Yellow Newton or Newtown Pippin) and the Virginia or Hewe’s Crab. 3,4

Sources:

1 Virginia Apple Growers www.virginiaapples.org

2 U.S. Apple Association www.usapple.org

3 Apples of North America: 192 Exceptional Varieties for Gardeners, Growers, and Cooks by Tom Burford, Timber Press 2013.

4 Old Southern Apples. A Comprehensive History and Description of Varieties for Collectors, Growers, and Fruit Enthusiasts by Creighton Lee Calhoun, Jr., Chelsea Green 2011.

Visit CiderGuide.com to view current US Cider Map and to see if Virginia has any new cider makers.

Please leave a comment if you have VIRGINIA cider resources to add.

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The State of Cider: New York and Virginia. As One Cider Week Concludes, Another Commences.

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Cider Week New York. With this years numerous pre and post events, Cider Week NY has become an extended cider-filled celebration, exuberantly launching New Amsterdam, and environs, into the colder seasons of pome fruit drinking enjoyment.

As New York cider festivities  – though not New York’s cider enthusiasm – wind down, Virginia prepares for Cider Week Virginia.  American wine has a long history in Virginia, as does American cider. Virginia’s cidermakers have done much to restore our favorite fermented apple elixirs place at the table, and Cider Week Virginia celebrates the regions cider heritage and revival.

Our September Cider Road Trip to Virginia was chock full o’ cider. Upcoming posts will feature highlights of our Blue Ridge & Balto. cider adventures, and details of favorite Cider Week NY activities.

Save The Date for the final Cider Week New York event, November 24th, 2013. The New Amsterdam Market, in collaboration with Glynwood, will host The Third Annual New York State Cider Revival at The New York State Cider & Thanksgiving Market. Visit  newamsterdammarket.com for more details.

Links:

Cider Week Virginia ciderweekva.com November 15-24, 2013.

New Amsterdam Market newamsterdammarket.com November 24th, 2013.

Cider Week New York ciderweekny.com

Glynwood glynwood.org

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The State of Cider: Virginia. The Ciders of Virginia Prepare to Celebrate Cider Week Virginia.

Orchard at Vintage Virginia Apples

Cider Makers of Virginia:

Albemarle Ciderworks North Garden

Blue Bee Cider  Richmond

Bold Rock Cider Nellysford

Castle Hill Cider  Free Union

Foggy Ridge Cider Dugspur

Old Hill Cider  Timberville

Potter’s Craft Cider Free Union

Winchester Ciderworks Winchester

Cider Week Virginia November 15 -24, 2013

There will be tastings, pairings, home cider making workshops, cider cocktail competitions, an East vs West Cider Smackdown and that’s not all. Check the Cider Week Virginia website for all the details and get ready to Celebrate Cider Week Virginia!

Link: ciderweekva.com

Events: http://ciderweekva.com/events/

Image: Fall Orchard View at Ablemarle CiderWorks & Vintage Virginia Apples

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The State of Cider: Massachusetts Prepares to Celebrate CiderDays.

 

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19th Annual Franklin County CiderDays will be held this weekend, November 2-3, 2013.

CiderDays is one of the premier events of the North American Cider Season.

From the website:

“CiderDays is a community event celebrating all things apples in Franklin County, Massachusetts. 2013 marks the 19th year of this event and there will be two days (November 2nd and 3rd) of orchard tours, cidermaking and tastings, workshops and much more. This is for all who love apples, fresh or hard cider, apple cuisine, apple orchards or just being in New England in the fall.”

Franklin County CiderDays November 2 – 3, 2013

Two days celebrating and enjoying The Apple.

A few of the 2013 Event Highlights that caught our eye:

• Second Annual Cider Days Harvest Party 2013 Friday, Nov 1st – A kickoff event to benefit  CiderDays & includes the début of West County Ciders releases for 2013.

The Cider Salon — “the world’s largest hard cider tasting with more than 60 individual  cider brands from across North America”. 

CiderDay Locavore Harvest Supper 

Spanish Cider Tasting and Discussion with James Asbel of Ciders of Spain

North vs. South Heritage Apple Smackdown, Part Deux, a tasting and discussion with   Tom Burford and John Bunker.

Michael Phillips talks about Apple Varieties for the Organic Orchard

• Finding a Great Cider Apple in Your Backyard with John Bunker and Claude Jolicoeur

Apples for Juice and Cider with Claude Jolicoeur and Alan Suprenant

Organic Orcharding Practices: A Primer with Jennifer Williams and Steve Gougeon

• So You Want to Be a Commercial Cidermaker with Steve Gougeon and Andy Brennan

• Cidermaking 101 Workshop with Bob Delisle and Charlie Olchowski

Visit Franklin County CiderDays website for ALL the details and a complete list of events.

Link: www.ciderdays.org

Note: A bit about CiderDays from the website:

“CiderDay began in 1994 when Terry and Judith Maloney organized a small event to celebrate their harvest. Now called CiderDays and sponsored by the Franklin County Chamber of Commerce, it is a two-day event which celebrates its 19th year in 2013. The event is always held on the first weekend of November, when even the late-bearing cider apples have been picked.”

 

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Observations on Cider. No. 265. 1867.

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No. 265.

Observations on Cider.

From the great diversity of soil and climate in the United States of America, and the almost endless variety of its apples, it follows that much diversity of taste and flavour will necessarily be found in the cider that is made from them. To make good cider, the following general, but important, rules should be attended to. They demand a little more trouble than the ordinary mode of collecting and mashing apples of all sorts, rotten and sound, sweet and sour, dirty and clean, from the tree and the soil, and the rest of the slovenly process usually employed ; but in return they produce you a wholesome, high-flavoured, sound, and palatable liquor, that always commands an adequate price, instead of a solution of “villanous compounds,” in a poisonous and acid wash, that no man in his senses will drink. The finest cider was made of an equal portion of ripe, sound pippin and crab apples, pared, cored, and pressed, etc., with the utmost nicety. It was equal in flavour to any champagne that ever was made.

Title: Six hundred receipts, worth their weight in gold : including receipts for cooking, making preserves, perfumery, cordials, ice creams, inks, paints, dyes of all kinds, cider, vinegar, wines, spirits, whiskey, brandy, gin, etc., and how to make imitations of all kinds of liquors : together with valuable gauging tables : the collections, testing, and improvements on the receipts extending over a period of thirty years.

Author: Marquart, John  1867

Publisher: Philadelphia : J.E. Potter

via internetarchive.org

Read online: https://archive.org/details/sixhundredreceipt00marq

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If You Like Cider, Like We Like Cider

LOC apple imageA Quick Reminder (as if you need to be prodded to go out and seek cider):

Cider events abound this time of year – so if you like cider, like we like cider,

partake of the cider activities occurring across the country. And take a friend.

A Sampling:

Cider Week NY & Hudson Valley is well underway and the New Amsterdam region is awash in cider.

Cider Week NY  – New York & Hudson Valley – October 18 – 27, 2013

Link: http://ciderweekny.com/

Great Maine Apple Day an apple-filled day of talks, walks and apple ID sessions with  John Bunker and book signings with Claude Jolicoeur.

Great Maine Apple Day October 27, 2013

Link: http://mofga.org/Default.aspx?tabid=294

Franklin County Cider Days is in its 19th year as a “community event celebrating all things apple.” Offerings include workshops, tastings, cider salons, and more.

Franklin County Cider Days – Franklin County, Massachusetts Nov 2-3, 2013

Link: http://www.ciderdays.org

Cider Week VA – Virginia – November 15 – 23, 2013

Virginia is Cider County. We enjoyed Virginia cider and hospitality on a recent visit, and you can too.

Link: www.ciderweekva.com

Slow Food Russian River Event: Cider & Cheese Pairing with Titled Shed Ciderworks and Devoto Orchards Cider. Oct 27, 3-6 PM for tickets:

http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/470210

RESOURCES: To find cider festivities in your area:

Visit the website, pages, and twitter feeds of your favorite local & regional cider makers to find out what events they are involved in.

Check your regional cider association, alliance, or organization’s events list.

Great Lakes Cider & Perry Association 

Hudson Valley Cider Alliance 

Northwest Cider Association

Rocky Mountain Cider Association 

Vermont Ice Cider Association 

And in Canada:

Cidre du Québec / Les Cidriculteurs Artisans du Québec 

Ontario Craft Cider Association

Perhaps it is time for a National Cider Calendar?

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REMATCH: Cider + Cheese. A Tasting with Tilted Shed Ciderworks and Apple Sauced Cider.

REMATCH: Cider + Cheese Pairing  

A while back we posted A Cheesemonger’s Challenge: Cider and Cheese Pairing with Tilted Shed Ciderworks 2012 GRAVIVA! Semidry Cider, conceived by our resident cheesemonger, and originally published at: Consider The Rind.

Graviva! label5-13X

The Idea: Select an interesting cider we have yet to try, and relying on the cider maker’s tasting notes, attempt to create a successful (at least on paper) cheese pairing.

Tilted Shed Ciderworks 2012 GRAVIVA! Semidry Cider from Ellen Cavalli and Scott Heath of Tilted Shed Ciderworks in the Russian River Valley, Sonoma County, California, was our cider pick. (You can read the original post here).

In reply to our challenge, the folks at Tilted Shed Ciderworks paired with Jolie Devoto-Wade and Hunter Wade of Apple Sauced Cider, and taking cues from our suggested cheese selection, created their own taste-off adding Apple Sauce Cider’s Save The Gravenstein to the mix.

APPLE SAUCED LOGO

Expanding on the original, the Sebastopol cider makers cheese selection included several local artisanal cheeses – guided by the pair local ‘what grows together goes together’ principle. 

Visit the Tilted Shed Ciderworks blog to read the full post: First-ever Sebastopol Cider and Cheese Challenge and learn the results of their actual cheese challenge tasting.

Save A Heritage Apple. Drink a Gravenstein Paired with Local Cheese.

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Saving Apples by Making Cider. Drink a Gravenstein Today.

Gravenstein

Pomme Fruit: Gravenstein Apples In The Russian River Valley, Sonoma County, California.

The Sebastopol Gravenstein, a vividly colored, aromatic, flavorful heirloom apple is historically important in the Russian River Valley. So dominant in the region, the ribbon of roadway running through the acres of orchards became known as The Gravenstein Highway – honoring the apples prolific presence. Declining prices for processing apples, the increasing popularity of other more ‘commercially viable’ apples, and a booming West Coast wine industry, all led to Gravenstein orchards being ripped out to make way for the extremely lucrative wine grapes that now populate the region.

David Karp, writing for the LA Times:

“Gravenstein is still a favorite in northern Europe and is cultivated from Nova Scotia to the Pacific Northwest, but it reaches its greatest perfection in the Sebastopol district of western Sonoma County, at the border of the maritime and inland climatic zones, where the morning fog gives way to a moderately hot afternoon sun. The area’s fine, sandy loam soil is well suited to apples. The huge trees, grafted on seedling rootstock, develop roots deep enough to survive the dry summers without irrigation.”

Concerned Sonoma County cider makers are working to revive interest in this heirloom apple by focusing on the Gravenstein’s many desirable cider worthy traits, crafting ‘Gravs’ into unique ciders that celebrate and express the heritage of the apple and the region.

Saving Apples by Making Cider. Drink a Gravenstein Today.

Find A Gravenstein Cider:

Tilted Shed Ciderworks: Graviva! Semi Dry Cider

Apple Sauced Cider: Save The Gravenstein! Cider

Devoto Orchards Cider: Gravenstein first release October 14, 2013

Gleanings (sources for further reading):

LATimes: The future of Gravenstein apples hangs on a thin stem by David Karp

NPR: Gravenstein Apples: The End Of Summer In A Fruit by Nicole SpIridakis

Zester Daily: The Fight To Save Sonoma’s Gravenstein Apple by Tina Caputo

Slow Food USA Ark of Taste: Sebastopol Gravenstein

Slow Food USA Sebastopol Gravenstein Apple Presidia

Gravenstein apple image (detail) – credit: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”

Link: The future of Gravenstein apples hangs on a thin stem. July 12, 2013 By David Karp. Special to the Los Angeles Times

 

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Cider Review: Farnum Hill Cider DOORYARD STILL CIDER Batch 1214: Cider52

Trained&PrunedAppleTree

Cider: FARNUM HILL CIDER DOORYARD STILL CIDER BATCH 1214 

Maker: Farnum Hill Cider & Poverty Lane Orchards   Origin:  Lebanon, New Hampshire

website: www.povertylaneorchards.com

ABV: 7.5%  Bottle: 750 ml, wine cork

Style Notes:  The Dooryard series are cider batches that departed from the flavor profiles of established Farnum Hill blends. Each keg or bottle of Dooryard Cider is marked with a batch number, allowing you to look up the details of your specific cider, giving you a glimpse into the cider making process at Farnum Hill.

Fruit: Apples. Golden Russet is a featured apple in this blend.

Cider Maker: Nicole LeGrand Leibon.

Makers Notes: Dooryard No. 1214 – Still, in Bottles:

Our first Still (no bubbles) Dooryard in a while, this opens with citrus and sweet florals. We used a high proportion of Golden Russet in this, and its fruity sweetness and full body comes through in the mouth, with pink grapefruit, sour cherry and quinine. The finish is long and fruity, with citrus and their peels carrying. (NL)

FH Dooryard Still

Our Tasting Notes:  

Farnum Hill Dooryard 1214 Still Cider pours a bright and shining rich roman gold, with gigantic bubbles that immediately fall dead still.

Slight smokey notes of tobacco leaf, whiskey, and oak meld with citrus peel, baked apple, roast honey, chalk and green pepper. A quick swirl offers up toasted hazelnuts, and a hint of pineapple.

The first taste is smooth, silky, pleasingly bitter, lightly tannic, a bit salty, with subterranean lingering apple tones.

Deliciously complex aromas confounded at first. On reading the cider makers tasting notes, the quinine with pink grapefruit peel became more clearly identifiable.

The floral aromas were more green than sweet reminiscent of lilies and tulips, herbaceous and slightly pungent.

Reading the cider maker’s tasting notes can be very helpful. Accurate, well written information from the cider maker can increase your cider knowledge, and enhance the cider drinking experience.

Overall Impressions: Extremely intriguing smokey and green floral aromas. Vinous and crisp, with refreshingly bitter flavors of quinine and grapefruit. An aromatic, complex and challenging cider. If you enjoy a brisk Gin & Tonic, and white wines with sharp minerality, this is a cider for you.

Taster’s Side Note: The fact that this is a very Golden Russet heavy cider, makes us want to explore other ciders that feature this apple.

Dooryard 1214 was featured as one of the The Ciders Of Summer. Our Favorite American Craft Ciders For Drinking Right Now, perfect for summer, but certainly a cider we would drink in these cooler months, if we could find a bottle.

 

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Other Pome Fruits: Pears and Quince Considered

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Other Pome Fruits: Pears and Quince Considered.

American cider makers are exploring cider beyond the apple. Pears, and even Quince, can be crafted into quite fine ciders. Along with our ongoing apple based cider research, upcoming posts will consider these other pome fruits, and the unique ciders, perrys and poires their artful fermentation produces.

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Cider52 Goal: A Cider Review A Week or 52 American Ciders in 2013

VA RT Treasures

Cider52: A Cider Review A Week The original plan: 52 weeks, 52 cider tastings, pairings and postings. As of May 3, 2013  we revised our goal, now it’s 52 American Made Ciders to be reviewed in 2013. We’ll continue to explore and review World Cider, but the 52 Ciders in 2013 goal is now CIDER USA.

With barely 13 weeks left in 2013 – we better get busy if we intended to meet our goal. So expect more cider reviews in these last few months of 2013 The Year of Cider.

US CIDERS REVIEWED SO FAR:

The list of American Ciders reviewed with links to the reviews:

January 2013

Original Sin Hard Cider Newtown Pippin

February 2013

Harvest Moon Cidery Four Screw Hard Cider with Maple Syrup

Pomona cider/braggot on cask, house brewed at Birreria, Eataly NY

March 2013

Slyboro Cider House Hidden Star

Slyboro Cider House Old Sin

April 2013

West Country Cider Redfield 

Harvest Moon Cidery Heritage Hops Hard Cider with Hops

Breezy Hill Orchard Hudson Valley Farmhouse Cider

West County Reine de Pomme 

Cider In Context: Breezy Hill Orchard Farmhouse Cider, Slyboro Cider Old Sin, Farnum Hill Extra Dry Cider

May 2013

Crispin THE SAINT

Crispin BARE NAKED 

Farnum Hill DOORYARD Batch 1202A 

Breezy HIll Orchard Barrel Tasting (6) ciders and barrel samples 

ANTHEM Organic Traditionally Fermented Cider 

June 2013

Aaron Burr Cider BOURBON BARREL CIDER Sparkling

Farnum Hill DOORYARD Batch 1206Tasting Journal

July 2013

Wandering  Aengus Ciderworks WANDERLUST 

August 2013

The Ciders of Summer. Our Favorite American Craft Ciders for Drinking Right Now:

September 2013

Farnum Hill FARMHOUSE CIDER

October 2013

Farnum Hill Cider DOORYARD STILL CIDER Batch 1214 pending

Eve’s Cider BECKHORN HOLLOW DRY CIDER pending

For a list of ALL ciders reviewed so far (Including ciders from around the world), see the CIDER REVIEWS: CIDER52 page.

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What We’re Reading: Scott Laboratories 2013 -2014 Cider Handbook.

Scott 2013-14

What We’re Reading: The 2013 -2014 Cider Handbook from Scott Laboratories.

September 7, 2013 Scott Laboratories announced its first ever Cider Handbook.

Known for an annual fermentation handbook, with information and resources geared to the needs of wineries, breweries, and distilleries in North America, the people at Scott Labs felt it was time to create a handbook focused on cider:

“The 60-page Handbook contains products, articles, and protocols specific to the cider industry. With cider sales in the U.S. tripling since 2007, Scott recognized that this growing market needed attention.”

The 2013-2014 Cider Handbook, is available in the U.S. and Canada. To request a free copy email info@scottlab.com. Or visit www.scottlab.com.

The end papers of the handbook features images courtesy of Albemarle CiderWorks, depicting 32 apple varieties including Golden Pearmain, Razor Russet, Black Twig, Crow Egg, and Redfield.

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Cider Mapping: NEW United States Cider Map with A-Z List by State at Cider Guide

Cider Mapping: See the NEW Map of United States Cider with A-Z List by State at Eric West’s Cider Guide.

A click on the map (below) will take you directly to Cider Guide.

Cider Guide US Map

(Our view of the map is current as of 10-4-2013. Go to www.ciderguide.com for the latest information).

When you want to know whose making cider, state by state in the US of A – check Eric West’s new map and list at ciderguide.com.

Cider Guide’s US CIDER map & list are helpfully color coded by category, and the list is organized by state. The information includes current  & announced cider producers, and producers of perry, ice cider, fruit wine, mead, and apple & pear spirits. Bottle shops that feature cider, and cider bars & restaurants are also noted.

Cider Guide’s current Stats for Cider in the US are:

 Cider Producers – 199
 Perry Producers – 19
 Ice Cider Producers – 17
 Fruit Wine (Apple/Pear) Producers – 46
 Mead (Apple/Pear) Producers – 26
 Spirits (Apple/Pear) Producers – 20
 Cider Bars/Pubs/Restaurants – 11
 Cider Bottle Shops – 14
 Cider Producers In-Planning – 27

Visit Cider Guide for a full view of the new US CIDER MAP and take a look at the cider maps for the rest of the world as well.

If you have notes or additions, please visit Cider Guide and leave a comment www.ciderguide.com.

 

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Aaron Burr Bourbon Barrel Cider – If You Find It, Drink It.

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Aaron Burr Bourbon Barrel Cider is only available at a handful of select establishments in the North East, and in very limited quantities.

A few sources we might suggest:

Jimmy’s No. 43 NYC

The Queen’s Kickshaw Astoria, Queens, NY

Eleven Madison Park  NYC

If You Find It – Drink It. We sincerely believe you will not be disappointed. You won’t have the opportunity to drink this cider again for at least 14 months.

Andy Brennan ages his small batch micro-crafted cider in bourbon barrels for 2 years – and there won’t be another release until very late in 2014 .

Here is a link to our tasting notes for Aaron Burr Bourbon Barrel Cider Sparkling.

If you want to explore the world of Aaron Burr Cider click here

And do read and enjoy Aaron Burr Cider’s Cider 101: True Cider in America

Cider Week NY Event: Talking About History: The History of Cider-making in New York with Andy Brennan of Aaron Burr Cider, Oct 13, 3-4 PM. RSVP required: programs@kingmanor.org.

The King Manor Museum
150-03 Jamaica Ave. (150th and 153rd Streets
Queens, NY 11432
For more 2013 Cider Week NY Events check the website www.ciderweekny.com
And for a full list of Aaron Burr Cider stockists check the link locations-find us
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(Early) American Cider Apples From DANIEL SMITH and CO. Nursery, Burlington, New Jersey 18o4

Agricultural.

Extract.

From The Trenton Federalist.
1803
One of the best opportunities for improving their plantations with choice fruit is now offered to the farmers in this part country, by the opening of the extensive nursery of Daniel Smith & Co. of Burlington, for the sale of trees. This nursery has been many years in  forming is certainly one of the grandest collections of choice trees in the United States. No expense nor pains have been spared to make the collection complete, and the taking bids fair to produce the greatest benefits to the agricultural interests of West Jersey. 1
danielsmithfruittreecatalogue1804-s

Below is a list of (early) American Cider Apples from DANIEL SMITH & CO. of Burlington, New Jersey, circulated as a broadsheet catalog for apple trees available in the fall of 18o4.

AMERICAN CIDER APPLES.
Note:
“The letter S. denotes the Trees of that kind being smaller than the others. C. denotes Cyder Fruit.”
  • APPLES.
  • 1 Large Newtown pippins
  • 2 Cooper’s russeting C.
  • 3 Michael-Henry
  • 4 Shippen’s russeting or Newark gate
  • 5 Summer queen
  • 6 White calville
  • 7 Reinette grise
  • 8 Sweet and sour
  • 9 Hunt’s green Newtown pippin
  • 11 Newark or French yellow pippin
  • 12 Redling
  • 13 Stockton’s early
  • 15 Large red and green sweeting
  • 16 Large early harvest
  • 17 Monstrous pippin
  • 18 Large piplin
  • 19 Golden pippin
  • 20 Everlasting apple
  • 21 Lady apple or Pomme d’Apis
  • 22 Doctor apple
  • 23 English codling
  • 24 Swett’s harvest
  • 25 Early junating
  • 26 Belle fleur
  • 27 Orange apple
  • 28 Black apple
  • 29 Hewes’s crab C.
  • 30 Wine sop
  • 31 Early bough apple
  • 32 Harrison apple C.
  • 33 Maiden’s blush
  • 34 Fall pippin
  • 35 Campfield’s apple C.
  • 36 Morgan’s apple
  • 37 Little early reinette
  • 38 White’s early pearmain
  • 39 Wine apple
  • 43 Rhode-Island greening
  • 44 Roman stem
  • 45 Pennock’s red winter
  • 46 Brown’s winter
  • 47 Gilpin or carthouse
  • 48 American pippin
  • 49 Catline
  • 50 Rambour
  • 51 Winter queen
  • 52 Hays’s winter
  • 53 Lady finger S.
  • 55 Ruckman’s pearmain S.
  • 56 Flushing Spitzbergen
  • 57 Newtown do. S.
  • 58 Aesopus do.
  • 59 Jersey greening
  • 60 American nonpareil
  • 61 Quince apple
  • 62 Burlington late pearmain
  • 65 Priestly
  • 67 Greyhouse or romanite
  • 71 Grub’s summer
  • 76 Granny Winkle C.
  • 83 Burlington greening
  • 84 Red Calville
  • 85 Newark sweeting.
A catalogue of the fruit trees, &c. in the nursery of Daniel Smith and Co. Burlington, New Jersey, for sale in the fall of 1804 …. [Burlington, 1804].
Source: Library of Congress, Rare Book and Special Collections Division.
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Apples, Cider, Bitters. Aperitivos Nuevo Asturian-style at Tertulia NYC

photoAperi

The Basics:

Sparkling Sidra: TRABANCO POMA AUREA  SIDRA De ASTURIAS. A sparkling cider made from Ragona and Raxao apples.

www.sidratrabanco.com

Apple Bitters: Try a house-made bitter, or one of the abundant small batch, hand-crafted, artisanal bitters increasingly available to the home mixologist.

To Garnish: Fresh thyme and raw apple matchsticks.

This tweet from @Tertulia_NYC reveals additional ingredient details:

Tertulia Cards

Click here for another Tertulia Cider Cocktail.

Ingredients: 

Rye whisky, a dash of fresh lemon juice, a splash of house-made thyme simple syrup

Eden Ice Orleans Herbal Ice Cider 

Eve’s Cidery Sow the Seeds Sparkling Cider

Angostura Bitters AND Baked Apple Bitters

HOW TO: 

Shake: rye, lemon juice, thyme simple syrup, ice cider. Strain. Top: with sparkling cider.

Finish: with a float of both bitters.

Cider. The perfect aperitivo.

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First Look: World’s Best Ciders: Taste, Tradition and Terroir. What We’re Reading.

9781454907886_p0_v1_s600

Authors: Pete Brown and Bill Bradshaw

Publisher: Sterling Epicure

Published: October 2013
256 pages
ISBN: 1-4549-0788-6
ISBN13: 9781454907886

Lucky to get an advance copy of World’s Best Ciders: Taste, Tradition and Terroir  (US/Can version) –  we are hunkering down with a craft cider for a good read and will report back with more detailed comments soon.

First impressions:

Hard bound and extensively illustrated with color photographs.

World’s Best Cider explores contemporary cider in the context of cider history, regional terroir, and local cider traditions. Authors Pete Brown and Bill Bradshaw examine world ciders by country, provide cider recommendations and tasting notes, and include profiles of several influential cider artisans responsible for crafting some of the world’s best ciders.

Pre-order a copy now via Amazon or Barnes & Noble.

http://www.sterlingpublishing.com

Available for purchase October 2103 at your local bookseller, including these sellers who carry books by Sterling Publishing:

In the USA

Hastings
Northshire Bookstore
Powells
University of Washington’s Bookstore
Tower.com

In Canada

Chapters Indigo
Vancouver Kidsbooks

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Cider Review: Farnum Hill Cider FARMHOUSE CIDER: Cider52

Trained&PrunedAppleTree

Cider: FARNUM HILL CIDER FARMHOUSE CIDER

Maker: Farnum Hill Cider & Poverty Lane Orchards  Origin:  Lebanon, New Hampshire

website: www.povertylaneorchards.com

ABV: 6.5%

Bottle: 750 ml, mushroom cork, wire hood

Fruit: Apples.

Cider Maker: Nicole LeGrand Leibon.

CiDER MAKERS NOTES: 

Our lightest, most casual cider, pale gold and bubbly, with a stroke of sweetness along with the tart, bitter, and fruity elements that good cider offers. Citrus, pineapple, bittersweet apple, and a trace of the barn. Farmhouse astringency is nowhere near the extreme, but shows a certain tannic edge. Agreeably versatile, sharing certain flavor elements with both beer and wine. A clean, appetizing finish makes it congenial with many kinds of food, from the snackiest to the whole-grainiest and back.

‘Farmhouse’ is more of a pub cider than our others. It varies a bit more from batch to batch, shows less complexity less alcohol than our others, and of course is less filling than beer. It and Semi-Dry are the most popular of our regular ciders. ‘Farmhouse’ is blended from a group of real cider apples that ripen earlier than most. So it’s a bit easier to make and less expensive to buy.

Visit the website to read more about  Farnum Hill ‘Farmhouse’

Farnum Hill Farmhouse Label

Our Tasting Notes: compiled over several tastings.

In The Glass: Clear, radiant shine. Glowing golden.

First Pour: Slight froth that immediately settles in to a light mousse ring with miniscule bubbles. Distinct legs.

Aroma: Green apple, warm sugar, apple peel, fresh green grass. Black pepper, grapefruit, rooty and a bit barky. Cidery, hint of quinine, ripe apple, powdered sugar, leather.

Swirl: Wood/oak – but not vanilla – slight tropical and dried fruit notes, pleasantly herbal, more quinine and grapefruit.

Taste: Fresh, bitter, tannic, and cidery. BSA. Extremely subtle sweetness. Rustic, nicely rough.

Finish: Long, slow, relatively gently tannins, soft powdery, slight citrus note. Bitter lingers, tapers off, and tannins slowly re-appear. Well balanced. Slightly drying and a bit warming.

2 tasters- (2) different Taste Ratings:

TASTE RATING SCALE: Our (2) tasters experience of the balance of bitter, sour, and umami was different:

Taster 1:  Bitter: 7  Astringency: 7   Sour: 6   Salty: 2   Sweet: 1   Umami: 3 

Taster 2:  Bitter: 3  Astringency: 7  Sour: 4    Salty: 2   Sweet: 1   Umami: 1

Our Pairing-The Tasting Lab:  None.

Overall Impressions: Farnum Hill Ciders DANCE. Visually, and in the mouth. Farmhouse Cider is no exception. The tannins and bitter notes tussle and tumble in this cider* and give you quite a flavor ride. Farmhouse is rustic yet focused, with bitter, sour, drying elements all jostling, and giving dimension to the cider. The aromas of this bumptious blend almost insists you drink it. For all its rough-hewn charm, this cider’s profile is very precise and finely honed. When drinking a Farnum Hill, you experience a well crafted, rounded, fully complete cider. There are no wrong notes, and much enjoyment to be had.

*This may be why our (2) tasters had different experiences of Bitter and Sour balance in this cider.

TERMS, DEFINITIONS & LINGO: 

BSA Bitter Sweet Apple: Referring to aroma and flavor characteristics of Bitter-Sweet Apple varieties used for cider. Bittersweet apples are low in acids and high in tannins. Tannin accounts for two palate sensations: astringency and bitterness.

From CIderUK.com:

Bittersweet apples impart the characteristic flavour of English ciders; as the name implies they are low in acid and high in tannin. The latter is responsible for two sensations on the palate – astringency and bitterness. In the bittersweet apple, there is a whole range of combinations of these two characteristics, varying from little astringency coupled with intense bitterness to very marked astringency coupled with mild bitterness. Typical bittersweets are Dabinett, Yarlington Mill and Tremlett’s Bitter.

ADDITIONAL READING:  FH Cider Talk & Terms Farnum Hill explains their cider profiles and the philosophy behind the ciders they craft.

 

If you have tasting notes to add please leave a comment.

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A Cider Is Announced: New US Cider Makers in 2013 – A Partial List

3g13962rJust a selection of the American cider companies announced and/or actively launched and producing cider so far in 2013:

One Tree Hard Cider WA

Seattle Cider Co. WA

Peoples Cider Co. MI

Blown Spoke Cider Co CO

Blue Bee Cider Co VA

Schilling WA

Twilight Cider WA

Commonweatlh Cider (Philadelphia Brewing Co.) PA

Atlas Cider OR

Cider Riot OR

Fox Tail Cider OR

Hood Valley Ciders OR

HR Ciderworks OR

Noble Cider  NC

Blake’s MI

Homestead Cider MA

Two Heroes Hard Cider NY

Compass Cider House CO

Bishop Cider Co TX

Downeast Cider Co. MA

This is a very informal list, if you are on it and were producing cider in 2012 – we’ll adjust the list. If you should be on the list – we’ll gladly add you.

Leave a comment or email corrections to unitedstatesofcider at gmail dot com.

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Ladies and Gentlemen A Cider Is Announced: WASHINGTON

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Ladies and Gentlemen A Cider Is Announced: WASHINGTON

In early 2013 we started keeping lists of cider makers by state.*

We posted our first A-Z List: WASHINGTON, on January 16, 2013. We recorded 14 Washington cider making entities.

Our updated revised A-Z List: WASHINGTON, dated September 17, 2013 has 22 Washington cidermakers listed.

Cider is indeed on the rise.

(We count wineries & brewers that also make cider or apple wine, and include makers that have announced but may not have a first release for sale yet)

If you have additions or corrections, please let us know.

A few useful resources for collecting US cider data:

United States Association of Cidermakers

Northwest Cider Association

Great Lakes Cider & Perry Association

Rocky Mountain Cider Association

Vermont Ice Cider Association

Cider Guide: The World Map of Cider

North American Cider Map Project

American Hard Cider Directory & Resource

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Ladies and Gentlemen: A Cider Is Announced! The Quaff of The Nation is on The Rise.

Ladies and Gentlemen: A Cider Is Announced! The Quaff of The Nation is on The Rise.

Cideries, Ciderworks, Cider Taprooms and More! Are Being Announced at an Alarming Rate.

Cider Coming Soon! appears on twitter profiles, websites, blogs, inter-webs, and various other modes of communication at a speed not recently seen in this Modern Age.

If we are not careful there will be cider purveyors on every street corner and our youth will spend their days dreaming of fermenting pome fruits into gold.

Anytown, USA – This Could Happen To You!

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Title: Interior of a cider mill at Rye
Creator(s): Abbey, Edwin Austin, 1852-1911, artist
Date Created/Published: [1879?]

LOC: http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2010714807/

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The Ciders of Summer. Our Favorite American Craft Ciders for Drinking Right Now:

LOC apple image

A Few of Our Current Favorite Summer Ciders:

West County Cider Redfield. A beautiful, pink hued cider with clean, clear tannins and lively acidity. Goes anywhere a rosé can go, and then some.

Farnum Hill Summer Cider. Effervescent, crisp, clear and bright. Well structured with a tannic finish as long and warming as a summer’s day.

Farnum Hill Cider Dooryard series: Current favorite: Batch 1214. A still cider, full of tannins and bursting with notes of quinine and pink grapefruit. A cider that quenches like a crisp gin & tonic.

Aaron Burr Bourbon Barrel Cider. Lean and sophisticated, notes of spice, citrus, apricot, and fresh apple with irrepressible bubbles providing continual refreshment.

Tieton Cider Works Apricot. The perfect outdoor entertaining cider. A fruity floral foil to tangy barbecue sauces and grilling marinades. Perfect as a base for a cider sangria and enjoying with brunch on the patio.

Eden Ice Cider Orleans Bitter. Anytime, anywhere, all summer long. On ice, mixed, shaken, stirred, spritzed, or frozen. A lovely herbal bitterness that refreshes.

Note: We have only begun to taste the variety that is American craft cider. If you have favorites, especially for summer cider drinking, please leave a comment.

Order is not indicative of preference.

 

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Cider Review: Etienne Dupont Cidre Bouché Brut de Normandie Organic 2011: Tasting Journal: Cider52

DupontOrganic

Cider: ETIENNE DUPONT CIDRE BOUCHE´ BRUT DE NORMANDIE ORGANIC 2011

Thoughts On A Bottle: Tasting Journal:

Review Note: Solo tasting. Team tasting review to follow.

In The Glass: Slight POP on opening. Pale, light medium golden with tinges of green and amber. Clear, bright, with miniscule bead, minimal mousse. Aromas of yeast, raw and cooked apple, orchard, sous bois, and tannins. Tastes of red and green apple skins, a tad meaty, band-aid, wet grass, woody, green notes, bark, slightly leathery. Sweetness – caramel, toffee, raisins, warm sugars, honey. Celery, rhubarb, herbal. Sweet and bitter notes, light tannins, not much acidity.

2nd glass: Mineral notes, wet stones. Slate-y, green, moss, deciduous trees, mown hay. Tidal flats, hint of salt, a bit floral, freesia. As bottle warms up acidity is more apparent – now showing some legs/tears. Far off hints of pine, cedar, bark. The green woody notes cut the sweet, sugar, apple, and honey.

More: Resin, freesia, honey, butter, spice.

Empty glass: Honey, wet tanned hides, damp straw. Visible sediment.

Temperature definitely affects experience of cider. As bottle warms up more flavor and aroma qualities are apparent.

Future tastings should utilize beverage thermometer to test temperature of cider being reviewed to see how variations in temperature affect how cider is experienced.

Pairings – The Tasting Lab: None.

Overall Impressions: Sweet grass. Passing pleasing bitter notes. Intriguing perfume. Damp hay and barnyard. Resin, freesia, honey, butter, salt and stones.

Cider: ETIENNE DUPONT CIDRE BOUCHE´ BRUT DE NORMANDIE ORGANIC 2011

Maker: Domaine Dupont

Origin: Normandy, France  website: www.calvados-dupont.com

Importer: B. United International, Inc. website: www.bunitedint.com

ABV: 4.5%  Bottle: 750 ml, champagne cork

Style Notes:  USDA Organic. Unfiltered and unpasteurized. Made with naturally occurring yeasts. The fermentation is controlled by successive racking. Bottled between May and April. No sulfites added.

Fruit: Apples. 100% organically grown apples of the Bisquet, Joly Rouge, Douce Coet and Binet Rouge variety.

Makers Fruit Notes: The apples and the techniques used to make the cider are in conformity with American standards relating to organic agriculture, “N.O.P. Organic”. The apples are entirely untreated.

Note: Domaine Dupont labels each bottling with vintage year.

Makers Notes on Terrior:

www.calvados-dupont.com/en/orchards

The poor soils of the Pays d’Auge region, consisting of marl and chalky marl of the Oxfordian (secondary era) limit the growth of the trees and this leads to the production of small apples. The aromatic intensity is thereby increased and the ratio of skin to pulp helps to favour the extraction of tannins. Nitrogenous fertilisers (which swell the fruit by water retention) are not used – giving priority to quality rather than yield.

From Wikipedia:

Marl: Marl or marlstone is a calcium carbonate or lime-rich mud or mudstone which contains variable amounts of clays and silt. The dominant carbonate mineral in most marls is calcite, but other carbonate minerals such as aragonitedolomite, and siderite may be present. Marl was originally an old term loosely applied to a variety of materials, most of which occur as loose, earthy deposits consisting chiefly of an intimate mixture of clay and calcium carbonate, formed under freshwater conditions; specifically an earthy substance containing 35–65% clay and 65-35% carbonate.[1]  

  1. Pettijohn (1957), p. 410.

If you have tasting notes to add please leave a comment.

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Cider Review: Wandering Aengus Ciderworks WANDERLUST: Cider52

Trained&PrunedAppleTree

Cider: Wandering Aengus Ciderworks WANDERLUST

Maker: Wandering Aengus Ciderworks

Origin: Salem, Oregon

website: www.wanderingaengus.com

ABV: 7.5 %   Bottle: Available in 16.9 oz crown cap bottles, and on draft.

Makers Style Notes: Semi-Dry and tart with a “warm ginger tone”.

Fruit: Apple. From orchards in Hood River & Culver, Oregon.

Makers Fruit Notes:

At Wandering Aengus Ciderworks we press and blend over 20 cider apple varietals to craft our ciders. Our cider specific apples originate from France, England, and pre-prohibition America, but are grown now in Oregon. These heirloom varieties are essential for the depth of flavor, excellent body, and delightful aromatics of our distinctive ciders.”

Tasting Notes: Wandering Aengus Ciderworks WANDERLUST: (2) separate tastings:

In The Glass: On First Pour: Color & Clarity: Radiant brass, bright, shining and clear with clusters of varied bubbles and slight tears.

Aroma: Intense upfront aromas of ‘real’ sugars, suggesting cloying sweetness, followed by cooked apple, maple, honey, toffee, black pepper and hints of orchard. Retro-nasally (aroma on exhale) there are floral-lily notes.

Taste: The fleeting sweetness of caramelized fruit and maple syrup is followed by crisp acidity, salt and a jolt of tannins. Woody and damp, the moderate tannins add complexity and balance, creating a honeyed-mead roundness reminiscent of fall. Like Anthem Cider, Wanderlust entices with sweet aromas, then surprises with a depth and structure beyond the initial sugary nose.

Our Pairings – The Tasting Lab: Gouda, black bean hummus, guava jam, and pickled jalapeño – a favorite grilled cheese from The Queens Kickshaw – this sweet spicy sandwich and cider combination is extremely complimentary. Mesclun greens tossed in jalapeño vinaigrette enhance the sois bois dampness in the cider, and the cider brightens the ‘greeness’ of the mixed lettuces.

Specific Qualities: This cider got us thinking about qualities of  ‘sous bois’, and orchard aromas.

“sous bois“- of the orchard or of the orchard undergrowth. A very particular range of aromas representing the many elements present in the orchard ecological system, from ripe to over ripe or even rotting fruit, fruit flesh and skins, fruit leaves, tree bark, orchard grasses, and soil. Overall very fragrant, pungent, sweet, earthy, and fecund. A unique aromal experience that simultaneously reminds one of both growth and decay.

Wandering Aengus Ciderworks Wanderlust’s aromas and flavors are transporting, vividly expressing the experience of walking through an orchard, bringing the seasonal cycles keenly into consciousness. A quality we find highly desirable, especially in a well crafted cider. Wanderlust possesses a slightly ‘damp orchard’ aroma, a seemingly logical result for a cider coming from the moisture abundant temperate climate of the Willamette River Valley region of Oregon. Is this a distinctly Northwest ‘sous bois’ or a particular Wandering Aengus Cider and Anthem Cider trait? Will this trait emerge as a defining characteristic of Northwest ciders? We can’t wait to find out.

Overall Impressions: Wandering Aengus WANDERLUST is an accessible, intriguing cider, offering the simple seductive allure of sweetness followed by well structured complexity.

If you are interested in the Willamette River Valley regions climate and growing sites details, as they apply to wine grapes, you can read about the regions 7 unique AVAs here and here.

If you have tasting notes, please leave a comment.

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Tasting Lab: Recipe: FREEZE IT! Cider and Ice Cider Granitas.

The warming temperatures inspired some cider experimentation. We made quick no fuss granitas from several ciders and ice ciders. Here are our results, and a few ideas for other freeze-ology experiments:

Tieton Cider Works Cherry Cider: A very fruit-forward, apple cider blended with cherries from Harmony Orchards fruit grown in Eastern Washington State.

Frozen Result: Refreshing. Try with a slice of lime. Tieton Cider Works Cherry Cider is a terrific base for popsicles, slushies or a fresh fruit cider sangria.

Tieton Cider Works Frost Ice Cider: A light “autumn blend” ice cider made from Harmony Orchards’ Jonagold, Pinova and Winter Banana apples.

Frozen Result: A gently sweet apple ice that would be lovely infused with bits of lemon thyme, or tarragon prior to freezing. Serve with a serious citrus twist.

Tieton Cider Works Wind: A warming bourbon barrel aged ice cider.

Frozen Result: A whiskey-like equivalent of a frozen margarita. Add fresh mint + simple syrup for mint julep-style frozen treat.

E. Z. Orchards Cidre: A French-style cidre from Oregon’s Willamette Valley.

Frozen Result: An amazing tannic treat. Palate cleansing, unexpected and addicting.

Eden Ice Cider Orleans Bitter: A recent addition to Vermont based Eden Ice Cider’s line, Orleans Bitter is a bracingly bitter refreshment, and our current go-to summer apéritif and a favorite mixology component.

Frozen Result: A perfect apéritif or digestif in delightful frozen form. No add-ons, adjuncts required or desired. Just freeze it.

Try This At Home!

DIY-HOW TO: Freeze ciders in shallow container (ice cube trays will do in a pinch) covered to seal out unwanted freezer flavors. Once frozen, scrape into granita texture, or fork-chip into a pleasing cider ice flake. Serve immediately, a small scoop is all that’s needed as flavors are intensified.

Further experiments with cider pops, cider slushies, home infused cider ices, and ice ciders over shaved ice – cider sno-cones! –  coming soon.

Notes: We favor craft ciders that use real fruit for our mixology and freezing experiments, and suggest you do the same. Be aware of the ABV% of your frozen treat –  easy to enjoy – it’s easy to forget they still contain alcohol.

For a bit more Granita How To visit Serious Eats.

Links:

Tieton Cider Works

E. Z. Orchards Cidre

Eden Ice Cider Company 

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Cider Review: Farnum Hill DOORYARD Batch 1206: Tasting Journal: Cider52

FHillDooryard1202ACider: FARNUM HILL DOORYARD BLEND 1206

Thoughts On A Bottle: Tasting Journal:

Review Note: Solo tasting. No team tasting pending as this batch of Dooryard cider is no longer available.

Makers Style Notes:

What ARE Dooryard ciders? “Lovely cider batches” that departed too much from the flavor profiles of established Farnum Hill Cider blends. The ongoing Dooryard series: experimental ciders, ranging from bittersweet to superfruity, that sell out quickly, never to be made again.”

Visit the Farnum Hill website to get specific notes on your batch of Dooryard using this link.

One of the best parts of drinking Farnum Hill Dooryard Ciders is reading the cider makers notes:

Cider Maker: Nicole LeGrand Leibon.

Cider Makers Notes on FARNUM HILL DOORYARD BLEND 1206: 

This new Dooryard was blended from our new big batch base 1205, a tank-end of 1211, and a partial barrel of 1311, Wickson.

This cider doesn’t color too far out of our usual Farnum Hill Ciders lines, compared to some previous Dooryard batches.  The nose carries a fair bit of BSA, but has bright spots of sour cherry and pineapple. There is pear and a little whiskey* in the nose, too.  The taste starts with a burst of fruity sweetness, but the sweetness drops quickly behind the bright acid and the nice, woody, BSA bitter. Orange and tangerine join the fruits from the nose, with a tiny bit of red candy.  The fruits in this one jostle for prominence; they take turns popping.

The astringency is moderately low, the feel medium-full.  The finish carries all of the fruits from the nose and taste, as well as a nice broad but mild bitter.  The whiskey note remains. Dare I say this reminds me of a tropical drink made with whiskey? Cherry on top.

-Cheers, Nicole

* I know. There’s always a caveat with me, isn’t there? The whiskey thing can be attributed to the barrels we use, because whiskey is aged in barrels, blah blah blah. The thing is, the barrels we use are neutral. REALLY neutral. Sold to us nigh on 15 years ago because the winemaker on Long Island we got them from thought they were too neutral THEN.  So we actually think a lot of the “whiskey” notes we get are just as likely to come from the apples we use. In fact, it has shown up in cider that was fermented in stainless steel, with no oak contact. Totally weird, huh? That’s why we still think we are learning. And why this job stays so fascinating. Weird stuff. Mother Nature is cool. Cheers to her!

Tasting Notes: Thoughts On A Bottle: Tasting Journal: 

In The Glass: Bright, clear golden, hint of amber in the glass. Extremely clear, shines. Subtle bead, light mousse. Slight legs, gentle tears.

Aroma & Taste: Fresh apple, baked apple fruit, sugar, spice, caramel, tropical fruit, pineapple, sous bois, orchard, wet grass, confectionary, winey, bit of barnyard, green pepper, black pepper, ginger-spice, honey, toffee.

Overall Impressions: Another interesting Dooryard Cider experience. Soft tannins, “juicy” acidity, hints of sweetness, lightly effervescent. Drinks like a tannic white wine. Probably drinking too cold and not getting the full spectrum of flavors, missing some of the subtle whiskey and bitter notes.

Cider: FARNUM HILL DOORYARD BLEND 1206

Maker: Farnum Hill Cider & Poverty Lane Orchards   Origin:  Lebanon, New Hampshire

website: www.povertylaneorchards.com

Fruit: Apples.

ABV: 7.5%  Bottle: 750 ml, champagne cork

Note: Tastings are generally team efforts. Occasionally we will post solo tasting notes. This is a solo tasting.

If you have tasting notes to add please leave a comment.

 

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Cider Review: Aaron Burr BOURBON BARREL CIDER: Cider52

Trained&PrunedAppleTree

Cider: Aaron Burr Cidery BOURBON BARREL CIDER Sparkling

Maker: Aaron Burr Cidery

Origin: Wurtsboro, New York

website: www.aaronburrcider.com

ABV: 7.6 % Bottle: 500 ml, mushroom cork, wire cage.

Style Notes: Sparkling cider. Aged 2 years. Home-tapped and boiled maple sap.

Fruit: Apple. Orange County, New York Apples: Spy, Idared, and Empire.

Cider Maker: Andy Brennan has some interesting thoughts on the American cider revival. See Cider 101:

“Unbeknownst to Americans born in the 20th century, cider is a world-class low-alcohol drink which expresses the character of the land. It also allows for stylistic variation from farmer to farmer. Some cider-makers strive toward refinement and complexity, cultivating for flavor nuances (i.e. tannin and sharpness), while others produce a rough and earthy drink popular in taverns. Think of them as culinary folk artists.”

Makers Notes: Dry and light bodied. Full M/L conversion: buttery with imparted smoke and vanilla from barrel. Drinks like a French-style white when still, less dry and w/ faint maple exhale when carbonated.

Our Tasting Notes: Aaron Burr Bourbon Barrel Cider: Reviews composed over (3) separate tastings.

In The Glass: First Impressions: Beautiful vintage inspired bottle and lovely graphic design with handmade letter-pressed labels. Almost as much fun to pour as to drink.

On First Pour: Prolific miniscule bead. Active, lively, spry bubbles create a pétillant fog in the glass.

Color & Clarity: White gold. Lightly opaque as a result of the exuberant effervescence.

Aroma: Delicate aromas of apple flesh, clean oak and vanilla. Hints of spice, black pepper and citrus.

Taste: Apple custard, cream, oak, vanilla, bourbon, and whiskey, followed by flavors of baked apple, and ‘sous bois’ orchard aromas. Warming medium-long finish, expressing subtle hints of spice, quinine, sulphur, resin, dried apricot and orange peel.

5 Tastes Scale: From 0 Low – 9 High:

Aaron Burr Cidery BOURBON BARREL CIDER scores: Bitter 4, Sour 3, Salty 3, Sweet 0, Umami not noted.

The Tasting Lab: We enjoyed Aaron Burr Bourbon Barrel Cider at The Queens Kickshaw, one of our favorite spots for imbibing, alongside a few of their menu items that practically begged to be paired with cider.

The spiciness of the blue mold in the Great Hill Blue grilled cheese sandwich (with prune jam and fresh pear salsa), comes alive when mingled with the varied whiskey flavors present in the cider.

Bread pudding with caramel sauce was caramel-apple whiskey perfection. A whipped cream smothered warm apple cobbler accentuated the ciders pure apple flavors, revealing tannins, and creating an explosion of flavor.

Cheesemonger’s Notes: Pair this cider with aged cheeses: Goudas, Cabot Clothbound Cheddar, Catamount Hills, or Sartori Gold.

Overall Impressions: A unique example of the beneficial effects of barrel aging on cider. An extremely refined, lean, sophisticated cider, Aaron Burr Bourbon Barrel Cider pairs exceptionally well with sweets, complex cheeses, and has enough depth and substance to be enjoyed simply, by itself. The finesse and quality of Aaron Burr Bourbon Barrel Cider signals this is a cider maker to watch.

Makers Cider Stats:

Bourbon Barrel Cider (2010-2011) 31 cases made  

Specs: Dry and light bodied.  Full M/L conversion: buttery with imparted smoke and vanilla from barrel.

Source: Orange County (NY) Spy, Idared, Empire apples, home-tapped and boiled maple sap.

If you have tasting notes to add please leave a comment.

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What We’re Reading: CIDERLAND by James Crowden

CIDERLAND by James Crowden

Meet the West County’s cider makers in this informative read. A great introduction to the world of South West England’s traditional West County cider culture, with numerous in-depth profiles of the regions cider makers.

www.james-crowden.co.uk

www.birlinn.co.uk

“Ciderland includes comprehensive summaries and descriptions of every cider and cider producer in the West Country and covers topics such as cider folk traditions and remedies, placing cider making firmly within the local culture. Photographs by Claire Lloyd Davies.”

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Cider Review: Val d’Ornón Sidra de Asturias Natural: Cider52

Carrio servicios_1242951376_450

Cider: Val d’Ornón Sidra de Asturias Natural

Maker: Sidra Menéndez

Origin: Asturias, Spain

website: www.sidramenendez.es

ABV: 6%  Bottle: 700 ml, with cork

Makers Style Notes: Product certified by the Council of the “PDO Sidra de Asturias”. Hand picked apples. Fermented using indigenous yeasts. Fermentation in chestnut wood barrels. Tasting Notes: Straw yellow, clean and fruity scent reminiscent of the origin of the fruit.

Fruit: Apple.

Makers Fruit Notes: Selection of some of the 22 varieties permitted by the Regulatory Council, including Raxao, Regona, Perico, Carrio, seeking a balance between those that are acidic, bitter and sweet.

Our Tasting Notes: May 10, 2013.

In The Glass: Cloudy, unfiltered, straw. Tiny bubbles visible only on the surface.

Aroma & Taste: Flavors: From 0 Low – 9 High:  Val d’Ornón Sidra scores: Sour Butter 7-8, Leather/Tanned Hides 6, Hay 5, Latent Acidity 4, Fresh/Raw Dessert Apple 3.

5 Tastes Scale: From 0 Low – 9 High: Val d’Ornón Sidra scores: Salty 5-6,  Bitter 4.5, Sour 3, Sweet 2, Umami 1.

Our Pairings – The Tasting Lab: Classic match with fiery chorizo and garlicy bitter greens, followed by sweet creamy blue & salty pressed rind cheeses, charred toasts and raw Granny Smith apple slices. Val d’Ornón Sidra is right at home with this simple, rustic country fare.

Overall Impressions: Funk forward with blossoming apple flavors. Old World style with balanced astringency and acid. Another cider that got us thinking about the similarities and differences between Spain’s Asturian sidras and the UK’s 3 Counties ciders, pondering the presence, quality, and unique expression of acidity in these two traditional regional cider styles.

To explore further: Why traditional Asturian sidras do not explore or develop the ‘sweet’ aspect of the pome fruit, instead embracing acidity without the tannic/bitter balance found in traditional UK ciders. Is this solely a result of the properties of Asturian cider apples? Or something else? Perhaps a Spanish chef, cidermaker, or Asturian/Basque food culture historian can provide insight.

Apple images from www.sidradeasturias.es  Apples shown: Carrio (top) Perico (below)

Sidra Menéndez Val d’Ornón Sidra de Asturias Natural video:

Perico servicios_1242951270_450

 

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Apple Sauced Cider’s Backyard Cider To Benefit Slow Food Russian River Apple Core Project

APPLE SAUCED LOGO

Date: March 19, 2013
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Sebastopol Cider Makers Rescue Backyard Apples for Charity

Sebastopol, CA (March 19, 2013) – Apple Sauced Cider™, a Sebastopol-grown cidery, is seeking local residents to donate apples from their backyard for a community cider blend called “Backyard” cider. Apple Sauced Cider will donate 100% of the profits from this batch of cider to Slow Food Russian River and its Apple Core project, which is responsible for raising awareness of and preserving the county’s apple heritage through marketing the region.

About “Backyard” Cider

As members of Slow Food Russian River and apple growers themselves, Hunter and Jolie Wade of Sebastopol’s Apple Sauced Cider aim to engage community members and give back by producing a “backyard” cider, a true expression of Sebastopol’s unique flavors. The cidery is looking for Sebastopol residents’ backyard apples to be donated and blended into a community cider. In the middle of August, the cidery invites all those who can donate to drop off early-season apple varieties, including gravensteins and others, into large bins at Devoto Gardens and Orchards in Sebastopol (Date TBA). The apples will be washed, pressed, fermented, and bottled by Apple Sauced Cider™ . The cidery will then donate 100% of the profits from this batch.

Continue reading

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Cheesemonger’s Challenge. A Cider and Cheese Pairing: Tilted Shed Ciderworks GRAVIVA! Cider

Cheesemonger’s Challenge:

Cider and Cheese Pairing with Tilted Shed Ciderworks 2012 GRAVIVA! Semidry Cider

Conceived by our resident Cheesemonger. Originally posted on: Consider The Rind

Graviva! label5-13X

Our pen pals at Tilted Shed Ciderworks have just released the 2012 vintage of GRAVIVA! their semidry cider featuring the Gravenstein, an endangered heirloom apple. We have yet to encounter any Tilted Shed ciders here on the East Coast but here at UnitedStatesofCider they have been present in many of our cider daydreams. When we drink cider we usually enjoy it with our other favorite obsession-  cheese. So for the launch of this new batch of GRAVIVA! I dreamed up a few supporting players for this fantasy cider session.

Since I have not (yet) tried GRAVIVA! I am basing the pairings on Tilted Shed Ciderworks own tasting notes:

The Gravenstein sparkles in this bright, crisp cider. The refreshing acidity is balanced with a touch of sweetness. We sourced the Gravs and other heirloom cider apples for this blend from organic growers in the Sebastopol area. The Grav lends its lovely aromatics, while a mix of “bittersweet” apples—which were specially developed over the centuries for fermented cider—imparts lively tannins. This is Sonoma County heritage in a bottle. Viva la Grav!

Great as an apéritif or celebratory bubbly, or pair with aged cheeses, spicy foods, and a hammock. Silver medal winner at the 2013 Great Lakes International Cider and Perry Competition.

grav

Some clues about the cider I pulled from this description:

  • “Bubbly” and “sparkles” = some type of carbonation or fizziness in the mouth
  • acidity
  • touch of sweetness
  • lively tannins

A brief ponderance on these qualities lead me to the following selections:

Cowgirl Creamery MT. TAM (from nearby Marin County, CA)
Bloomy rind, Triple Crème, Cow’s Milk
Tasting notes: Fresh Butter, whispers of Mushroom, Salt
Why this pairing?

  • Smooth and buttery. Triple crèmes must have at least 75% butterfat to be called such. It is achieved through the addition of cream or crème fraiche to the fresh curds. A decadent contrast to the often restrained qualities of cider.
  • Carbonation and Acidity from the cider will cut through the richness serving as a light and airy counterpoint to the dense and unctuous cheese.
  • The cheese is mild and fairly neutral, providing a creamy backdrop to show off the flavors in the cider. Apple or other fruit flavors when mingled with the cream flavors are likely to create the taste and mouthfeel of a fruit custard or cream pie.

The way I approach pairing is through the comparison of what I call Sameness or Differentness in the possible mates. I think about some traits of the focus item (in this case GRAVIVA! Cider), then scan through my taste memories in search of things that either share these traits or are very different. This particular pairing is an example of Differentness. In the case of Graviva! and Mt. Tam the cheese and cider have aspects (texture and flavor) that are opposite. Combining them brings more variety and enjoyment to the overall tasting experience. Opposites really do attract! Well sometimes. Too much differentness can produce negative results. One characteristic may overpower and obliterate the others or there might just be too many clashing flavors. It’s tricky; you’re looking for that perfect mixed doubles player who is going to complement your game, not a sparring partner to knock around.  Mt. Tam is a straightforward (albeit superb) little cloud that should showcase the cider without sacrificing any of its own flavors.

Laura Chenel CHABIS (Sonoma County, CA) 
Fresh, Goats Milk
Tasting notes: Sweet Cream, Lemon
Why this pairing?

  • The textures of fresh goat’s milk cheeses are chalky, flaky and light.  The light and lively characteristics of both the cheese and cider should keep either from overpowering the other. Acidity in the cider and the tangy lemony flavors in cheese are evenly matched. This is an example of Sameness. There is no struggle between the two.
  • The effects of acidity may even get a lift from the combination, intensifying the trait in the cider without destroying the cheese.
  • Sonoma County terroir. French production methods. (Note: not all herds are in Sonoma County, some are across the border in Nevada.)

Another aspect in which Graviva! and Chabis share sameness, is in their origins. This is a tried and true pairing technique used for all sorts of foodstuffs and drinkstuffs everywhere. The influences of the soil and atmosphere somehow create an understanding among things even though they may express the effects differently. Things that grow together rarely brawl. The use of Old World methods in the New World is another parallel that appealed to me for this match up. Laura Chenel was a pioneer of chévre bringing the wonderful French tradition of goats’ milk cheeses to the USA in the 1970s. The beet and goat cheese salad craze we appreciate today may not have happened without her. Tilted Shed is utilizing traditional European cider making methods to preserve apples and a piece of American heritage a la the cider revival. Food can be very philosophical. Thought provoking pairings should not be underestimated as they may add another layer of satisfaction to the already enjoyable experience of consuming two virtuous cohorts such as cider and cheese.

Uplands PLEASANT RIDGE RESERVE (Wisconsin)
Firm, Aged, Raw Cow’s Milk
Tasting notes: Nutty, Grassy, with a hint of Sweetness
Why this pairing?

  • Both the dry, slightly crumbly cheese and the effervescent cider are on the light side, nothing heavy or dense in either.
  • The nut and vegetal tones in the cheese may tame the acid and tannins in the cider and bring out some fruit notes. Just a hunch.

This pairing has both sameness and differentnessSameness in the textures.  Differentness in flavors. More complex than the other two cheese selections, Pleasant Ridge Reserve (especially the Extra-Aged editions) is fairly savory, and not at all tart. There is some sameness in flavor however with a “touch” or “hint” of sweetness described for both the cider and the cheese.  I am hoping this flavor echo is the thread that stitches it all into one very jolly amalgam.

If you are lucky enough to have Graviva! and any of these cheeses available to you I would love to hear your comments on the actual results of these pairings. Is it a cheese and cider dream come true? Nightmare? Somewhere in between? Only tasting will tell. Please share your experience.

(You can read more Adventures in Cheese at Consider The Rind and follow cheese related content @ConsiderTheRind on twitter)

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