What We’re Reading: Uncultivated Wild Apples, Real Cider, and the Complicated Art of Making a Living by Andy Brennan

Andy Brennan of Aaron Burr Cider wrote a book – Uncultivated Wild Apples, Real Cider, and the Complicated Art of Making a Living.

From Chelsea Green Publishing:

“The hero of this book is the wild apple. Uncultivated follows Brennan’s twenty-four-year history with naturalized trees and shows how they have guided him toward successes in agriculture, in the art of cider making, and in creating a small-farm business. The book contains useful information relevant to those particular fields, but is designed to connect the wild to a far greater audience, skillfully blending cultural criticism with a food activist’s agenda.”

Here are links to some additional information about Andy, Aaron Burr Cider, wild apples and real ciders:

About Aaron Burr CiderAaron Burr Cider’s Cider 101

Eric Asimov in The New York Times
A New Golden Age for Cider Production in New York

Rowan Jacobsen in Tasting Table
The Feral Cider Society: Looking for the Future of American Cider on the Side of the Road

1899: Vintage Herefordshire Apples, and “French sorts”

Rackham Pomona

A committee composed of members of the Herefordshire Fruit-Growers’ Association and of the Fruit and Chrysanthemum Society was appointed in 1899 to make a selection of vintage apples and pears best suited to Herefordshire and the districts adjoining.

The following is the list drawn up by the committee:

The Apples:

Old Foxwhelp 
Cherry Pearmain
Cowarne Red
Dymock Red
Eggleton Styre
Kingston Black or Black Taunton
Skyrme’s Kernel
Spreading Redstreak
Carrion Apple
Cherry Norman
Cummy Norman
Royal Wilding
Handsome Norman
Strawberry Norman
White Bache or Norman
Broad-leaved Norman
 
and
 
Argile Grise
Bramtot
De Boutville
Frequin Audievre
Medaille d’Or
 
These last five being “French sorts” introduced from Normandy about 1880, and now established in the orchards of Herefordshire.

Adapted from an online version of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica – Article: CIDER, or CYDER (from the Fr. cidre, derived from the Lat. sicera or cisera, Gr. mucepa, Heb. shade, strong drink)

Read more here: CIDER, or CYDER 

What We’re Reading: Apples To Cider. How To Make Cider At Home by April White with Stephen Wood of Farnum Hill Ciders

What We’re Reading: Apples To Cider. How To Make Cider At Home

by April White with Stephen Wood of Farnum Hill Ciders

Apples To Cider. How To Make Cider At Home

Harvest Times

Deadline Bean Town. 3 Cider Taste-Off Results. A Report from Outpost Boston.

BostonTasteOff

From Our Boston Outpost:

Some time ago our intrepid Bean Town Cider Correspondent led a cider tasting somewhere in wilds of greater Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Tasters were a diverse batch –  ranging in age from just-legal whippersnappers, to seasoned imbibers. Of the assembled tasters a select few were cider-philes, most had only a glancing familiarity with our favorite pome fruit beverage, and some were completely cider-unaware, having no idea what to expect from a fermented apple elixir.

Ciders were selected based on local availability.

The Cider Contenders:

Bantam WUNDERKIND of Massachusetts

Fatty Bampkins DRY hailing from Maine

Vermont Cider Co. FARMHOUSE No. 91 

The 3 ciders were presented, glasses filled and the tasters let loose.

Our correspondent placed paper and pen by each cider bottle, and the testers jotted anonymous notes as they tasted.

Real people drinking actual ciders. Here is what they had to say:

Bantam WUNDERKIND Tasting Comments:

“The champagne of ciders!”

“Light, a wee sharp upfront, (illegible), like sparkling wine.”

“Likey!”

“Very sweet”

“Good body, nice aftertaste. A little too sweet.”

“Good with Food/Meal.”

“Sweet & tasty, makes me want a donut.”

“NICE!”

“More like apple juice.  Sweet & crisp but blends well.”

“Good sparkle & flavor. Has mellow apple flavor.”

Fatty Bampkins DRY Tasting Comments:

“faint apple taste”

“Light/Fresh, Refreshing – Not Much Flavor”

“Very Adult. – DRY.”

“Too TARTE”

“slight pickle scent??”

“No me gusta tambien. Very vinegary, not much apple flavor”

Vermont Cider Co. FARMHOUSE No. 91 Tasting Comments:

“sweet apple taste (heart).”

“Like soda-pop. Tastes like apples. (On purpose?)”

“delicious. very sweet. would prefer it to be a little more bubbly!”

“Flat but could be tasty otherwise.”

“Perfect for tweens.”

“Lacks effervescence, a bit sweet, but could be good in a cocktail!”

“Not enough effervescence for me, but the flavor is smooth.”

“Did I just drink alcohol? Pretty sure it was juice.”

The Consensus: Local craft cider Bantam WUNDERKIN is hands down favorite at this informal Boston cider tasting.

The Take Away:

1. We believe there is a cider for everyone.

2. How to find YOUR ciders?  Taste Testing. Extensive Taste Testing.

3. Cider Tasting is More Fun in Groups. Cider knowledge shared while tasting is enjoyable, and informal, casual tastings brings out the best in most ciders, and certainly results in some interesting comments.

4. If you like cider and want to share the cider joy, an informal tasting like this is a good way to introduce your cider-curious friends to the wonderful world of cider.

Cider Review: Eve’s Cidery BECKHORN HOLLOW DRY CIDER: Cider52

Trained&PrunedAppleTree

Cider: BECKHORN HOLLOW DRY CIDER

Maker: Eve’s Cidery   Origin:  Van Etten, New York

website: www.evescidery.com

ABV: 8%   Bottle: 750 ml

Makers Style/Bottle Notes: “Naturally sparkling cider, fermented in this bottle”.

Fruit: Apple  Cider Maker:  Autumn Stoscheck

Our Tasting Notes: First glass, drinking at about 52 degrees.

In The Glass:  Clear, pale, white-gold with a small, steady bead that settles to no visible bubble. 

Aroma: Apple peel, marzipan, honey, raw apple, baked apple, grassy, powdered sugar, citrus peel and spice.

Taste: Tart, sweet, slightly spirituous and warming, with stone fruit, dried apricot, and anise & fennel.

Overall Impressions: Refreshing with pleasing tart acidity, balanced by sweet, sour, and subtle bitter notes. Intend to taste this cider again if we can find – it’s a special blend – we discovered ours at Eve’s Cidery’s New York GrowNYC Greenmarket stall at Union Square. This cider is currently not listed on Eve’s Cidery’s website.

BONUS MIXOLOGY TIP: Eve’s Cidery Beckhorn Hollow Dry Cider with a splash of Eden Ice Cider Orleans Bitter is delicious and tremendously refreshing. Makes an easy apéritif or the start of an interesting cocktail.

Watch an informative video about Eve’s Cidery’s orcharding practices: Orcharding with Autumn from Eve’s Cidery on Vimeo.

Eve’s Ciderywww.evescidery.com

Find Eve’s Cidery’s stall at the GrowNYC Union Square Greenmarket www.grownyc.org:  Friday MapSaturday Map.

Eden Ice Ciders: www.edenicecider.com

Oh, Ithaca! A Very Moist City. 1921.

cropped-observations.jpg

The Cornell Daily Sun

Volume XLII, Number 4, 24 September 1921

MANUFACTURERS OF CIDER TOLD TO GET PERMITS

Federal Inspector Lays Down Law to Makers of the Beverage.

ITHACA VERY MOIST CITY

Official Claims More Liquor Here Than in Other Towns of Same Size.

REGULATIONS ON VINEGAR

Cannot Be Manufactured Without Having Bonds and Taking Legal Steps.

“There Is more liquor in Ithaca than in any other city of its size in New York State, according to a statement made by the federal director,” declared Jay Carpenter when he returned yesterday afternoon from a short trip to Syracuse. Mr. Carpenter, who was accompanied by E. J. Holmes, said that they had received instructions from the “district prohibition agent that neither they nor any other cider manufacturers in Tompkins county would be permitted to make any more cider unless they first obtained a federal permit and then gave a guarantee that the cider would never become sour. The official also informed his visitors that the federal agents have Ithaca in mind for another visit in the near future. It Is understood the interest of the federal enforcement bureau was drawn to Ithaca due to the large sales of hard cider which have been made in this city. Mr. Holmes and Mr. Carpenter, both of whom manufacture clder on an extensive scale, were cited to appear before the federal director in ‘Syracuse on Thursday. They were ‘ Turned that they had no right to manufacture cider without a permit and that if they obtain a permit they must absolutely guarantee that the cider would not turn sour. Mr. Carpenter maintained that, although his cider is pasteurized before it is sold, he cannot guarantee it will not become sour. The federal director informed the Itathacans that they could obtain permission to manufacture vinegar by filing a $2,000 bond and taking other necessary legal steps.

Windfalls: Found Apple Poems, A Selection.

4a21388vLOC 
 
– – –
 
Api Panache
 
 
(Panachee).
 
Yellowish green,
 
 
round-ish, small,
 
indifferent;
 
 
October to December ;
 
 
more curious than useful.
 
– – –
 
Bedfordshire Foundling
 
 
(Cambridge Pippin). –
 
Yellow, roundish, oblong, large, kitchen,
 
 
first-rate ;  
 
 
November to March ;
 
 
very handsome, large and ex-cellent.
 
 
Bennet.
 
 
Greenish red, ovate,
 
 
middle-sized,
 
 
cider ;
 
 
November to December ;
 
 
a bitter-sweet. 
 
 
 
 
 

The Gardener”s Monthly Volume.

The Apple

It’s Culture, Uses, and History

1847

by George William Johnson & R. Errington

via googlebooks

Come All Ye Cider Drinkers And Join In The Wassail!

 

When is Wassail? We suggest observing North American Wassail celebrations from January 5th to  January 17th, 2014.*

Wassail is an informal collaborative effort of interested cider-drinkers in North America (and beyond).

Goals for the 2014 Wassail: Explore Old & New World Wassail Traditions, Salute The Orchard, Honor The Apple and Celebrate With Cider!

How Can You Wassail? It’s Easy! Enjoy cider and a wassail bowl with friends, visit an orchard, cidermaker or local cider-serving establishment and toast the orchard & the apple, or host a Wassail event of your own.

Let us know if you’re planning an event – we’ll post it on the Wassail 2014 page.

Share your Wassailing plans and pictures. Post, tweet, tumble and instagram The Wassail!

* We’re considering Wassailing all the way through January. Why not?!