Tag Archives: Apple

1899: Vintage Herefordshire Apples, and “French sorts”

Rackham Pomona

A committee composed of members of the Herefordshire Fruit-Growers’ Association and of the Fruit and Chrysanthemum Society was appointed in 1899 to make a selection of vintage apples and pears best suited to Herefordshire and the districts adjoining.

The following is the list drawn up by the committee:

The Apples:

Old Foxwhelp 
Cherry Pearmain
Cowarne Red
Dymock Red
Eggleton Styre
Kingston Black or Black Taunton
Skyrme’s Kernel
Spreading Redstreak
Carrion Apple
Cherry Norman
Cummy Norman
Royal Wilding
Handsome Norman
Strawberry Norman
White Bache or Norman
Broad-leaved Norman
 
and
 
Argile Grise
Bramtot
De Boutville
Frequin Audievre
Medaille d’Or
 
These last five being “French sorts” introduced from Normandy about 1880, and now established in the orchards of Herefordshire.

Adapted from an online version of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica – Article: CIDER, or CYDER (from the Fr. cidre, derived from the Lat. sicera or cisera, Gr. mucepa, Heb. shade, strong drink)

Read more here: CIDER, or CYDER 

Tagged , , , ,

Windfalls: Found Apple Poems, A Selection.

4a21388vLOC 
 
– – –
 
Api Panache
 
 
(Panachee).
 
Yellowish green,
 
 
round-ish, small,
 
indifferent;
 
 
October to December ;
 
 
more curious than useful.
 
– – –
 
Bedfordshire Foundling
 
 
(Cambridge Pippin). –
 
Yellow, roundish, oblong, large, kitchen,
 
 
first-rate ;  
 
 
November to March ;
 
 
very handsome, large and ex-cellent.
 
 
Bennet.
 
 
Greenish red, ovate,
 
 
middle-sized,
 
 
cider ;
 
 
November to December ;
 
 
a bitter-sweet. 
 
 
 
 
 

The Gardener”s Monthly Volume.

The Apple

It’s Culture, Uses, and History

1847

by George William Johnson & R. Errington

via googlebooks

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Malus domestica: Smith Cider, Rosslyn, Arlington County, Virginia, 1932

Malus domestica: Smith Cider

Malus domestica: Smith Cider

Malus domestica: Smith Cider

Artist:
Arnold, Mary Daisy, ca. 1873-1955
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Variety:
Smith Cider
Geographic origin:
Rosslyn, Arlington County, Virginia, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 17 x 25 cm.
Specimen:
112350
Year:
1932
Notes on original:
Section J, Row 17, Tree 3
Date created:
1932-01-30
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
Tagged , , , ,

Heirloom Apples. New Amsterdam Market.

3 Apples Grav, Pitmaston, H.Nonesuch

New Amsterdam Market at the old Fulton Fish Market, on South Street and Peck Slip in Lower Manhattan, this Sunday, September 29th, featured regional cheese makers and dairy products. We could not resist these beautiful apples at the Flying Fox stall. Gravenstein, Pitmaston Pineapple, Hubbardston Nonesuch, diminutive Dolgo Crab, the charmingly named Famuese, to mention only a few, each more lovely than the next.

Grav, Pitmaston & Hubardston NAM

Support your local growers and farmers markets, and encourage fruit diversity by ‘eating it to save it’. Enjoy the seasons beautiful heritage pome fruits.

Dolgo-close

New Amsterdam Market www.newamsterdammarket.org:

“Since 2006, New Amsterdam Market has advocated for the preservation and rehabilitation of the Old Fulton Fish Market, a public-owned site of immense value for both cultural and economic development.”

Read more about the vision for the Seaport and the Market District here.

Flying Fox, fruit hand-picked and selected by fruiterer, Maggie Nescuir.

Tagged , ,

Apple Belts of North America circa 1914.

LOC apple image

The Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture:

Apple belts.

In comparing the great apple growing regions of the continent it is convenient to designate each by its leading variety. In the eastern part of the continent, there is the Fameuse or Wealthy belt on the north, the Ben Davis belt on the south, and the Baldwin belt lying intermediate between these two. It is seen that varieties differ greatly as to their adaptability to different regions. The degree of soil aeration and of soil moisture and the range of atmospheric and soil temperatures are among the most important determining factors of the geographical range of commercial apple growing with any variety. Passing westward into the mid continental region it is found that the Baldwin belt does not extend west of Lake Michigan. The climatic extremes are here too severe for that variety and many of its eastern associates of a similar degree of hardiness.

In all that vast territory which extends westward from the Great Lakes these varieties disappear and do not again appear till the states of the Pacific Coast are reached. Instead the Wealthy belt extends southward till it reaches the region where Wealthy yields leadership to Ben Davis. In this connection it is worthy of note that from the Atlantic Coast westward to the Missouri River, the north margin of the Ben Davis belt approximately coincides with the southern boundary of the geological area covered by the Wisconsin drift.

Wealthy belt.

The mid-continental territory in which Wealthy is generally speaking the leading variety includes northern Illinois, the north half of Iowa, and practically all of the apple growing districts of Wisconsin, Minnesota, South Dakota, and northern Nebraska. Among the more important varieties associated with it are for the more northern parts Oldenburg, Okabenal, Patten (Patten Greening) and Malinda. Among the very hardiest of the large size apples for the North are those of the Hibernal group, but their fruit is so austere that it is esteemed of little value except for culinary uses. In the southern part of the Wealthy belt are grown hardy varieties of more or less local value such as Salome, Windsor, Black Annette and Colorado Orange varieties which as yet have not established themselves in the great world markets but which are valued where better varieties cannot be satisfactorily grown.

Ben Davis belt.

Generally speaking, Ben Davis is the leading variety in central and southern Illinois, the south half of Iowa, and the apple growing districts of Arkansas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Kansas and the south half of Nebraska. With its close kin the Gano, and the Black Ben Davis which evidently are highly colored bud sports of Ben Davis. it probably produces at least one half of the commercial apple crop in this region. Winesap and Jonathan appear to be next in order of importance with Winesap perhaps in the lead. Other important varieties are Grimes, Rome Beauty, Willow (Twig), Missouri (Pippin), Minkler and Ralls. York Imperial is gaining ground Stayman Winesap is one of the newer kinds which will be more largely planted. Delicious also is attracting attention particularly because of its agreeable dessert quality and good appearance. The Stayman and Delicious are being planted to some extent in the southern part of the Wealthy belt as Jonathan and Grimes have been.

Page 325.

From:

The Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture:

A Discussion for the Amateur, and the Professional and Commercial Grower, of the Kinds, Characteristics and Methods of Cultivation of the Species of Plants Grown in the Regions of the United States and Canada for Ornament, for Fancy, for Fruit and for Vegetables; with Keys to the Natural Families and Genera, Descriptions of the Horticultural Capabilities of the States and Provinces and Dependent Islands, and Sketches of Eminent Horticulturists, Volume 1

Edited by Liberty Hyde Bailey, Macmillan, 1914

Read or download a copy via google here.

Tagged , , , , ,

Malus domestica: Baldwin

POM00001449

Malus domestica: Baldwin

Artist:
Arnold, Mary Daisy, ca. 1873-1955
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Variety:
Baldwin
Geographic origin:
New Bedford, Bristol County, Massachusetts, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 16 x 25 cm.
Specimen:
79743; 79759
Year:
1915
Date created:
1915-01-11
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
Tagged , ,

Malus domestica: Ben Davis

POM00000163

Malus domestica: Ben Davis

Artist:
Newton, Amanda Almira, ca. 1860-1943
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Variety:
Ben Davis
Geographic origin:
Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 17 x 25 cm.
Specimen:
55896
Year:
1912
Date created:
1912-03-29
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
Tagged , ,

Malus domestica: Stayman Winesap

POM00002503

Malus domestica: Stayman Winesap

Artist:
Newton, Amanda Almira, ca. 1860-1943
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Variety:
Stayman Winesap
Geographic origin:
Winchester, Virginia, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 16 x 25 cm.
Specimen:
60433
Year:
1913
Date created:
1913-01-09
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
Tagged , , ,

Malus domestica: Arkansas Black

POM00000982

Malus domestica: Arkansas Black

Artist:
Steadman, Royal Charles, b. 1875
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Variety:
Arkansas Black
Geographic origin:
Rosslyn, Arlington County, Virginia, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 17 x 25 cm.
Specimen:
99704
Year:
1921
Date created:
1921
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
Tagged , , ,

Malus domestica: Smokehouse

POM00003336

Artist:
Steadman, Royal Charles, b. 1875
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Variety:
Smokehouse
Geographic origin:
Rosslyn, Arlington County, Virginia, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 17 x 25 cm.
Specimen:
103682b
Year:
1923
Date created:
1923-10-11
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
Tagged , , ,

Malus domestica: Grimes Golden

POM00002200

Malus domestica: Grimes Golden

Artist:
Arnold, Mary Daisy, ca. 1873-1955
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Variety:
Grimes Golden
Geographic origin:
Winchester, Virginia, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 17 x 25 cm.
Specimen:
110478
Year:
1928
Date created:
1928-10-13
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
Tagged , ,

Malus: Hewes

POM00003580-1

Malus: Hewes

Artist:
Arnold, Mary Daisy, ca. 1873-1955
Scientific name:
Malus
Common name:
crab apple
Variety:
Hewes
Geographic origin:
Rosslyn, Arlington County, Virginia, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 17 x 25 cm.
NAL note:
Alternative variety name(s): Hewes Crab
Specimen:
109587
Notes on original:
Accession Number 10874; Section K, Row 23, Tree 2; Picked 10/04/1927
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
Tagged , , , ,

Malus domestica: Yellow Newtown (Albemarle Pippin)

POM00000527

Malus domestica: Yellow Newtown

Artist:
Passmore, Deborah Griscom, 1840-1911
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Variety:
Yellow Newtown
Geographic origin:
Charlottesville, Virginia, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 17 x 25 cm.

NAL note:

Alternative variety name(s): Albemarle Pippin; Charlottesville is an independent city located adjacent to Albemarle County

Specimen:
32783
Year:
1904
Date created:
1904
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
Tagged , , , ,

Cider Review: Etienne Dupont Cidre Bouché Brut de Normandie Organic 2011: Tasting Journal: Cider52

DupontOrganic

Cider: ETIENNE DUPONT CIDRE BOUCHE´ BRUT DE NORMANDIE ORGANIC 2011

Thoughts On A Bottle: Tasting Journal:

Review Note: Solo tasting. Team tasting review to follow.

In The Glass: Slight POP on opening. Pale, light medium golden with tinges of green and amber. Clear, bright, with miniscule bead, minimal mousse. Aromas of yeast, raw and cooked apple, orchard, sous bois, and tannins. Tastes of red and green apple skins, a tad meaty, band-aid, wet grass, woody, green notes, bark, slightly leathery. Sweetness – caramel, toffee, raisins, warm sugars, honey. Celery, rhubarb, herbal. Sweet and bitter notes, light tannins, not much acidity.

2nd glass: Mineral notes, wet stones. Slate-y, green, moss, deciduous trees, mown hay. Tidal flats, hint of salt, a bit floral, freesia. As bottle warms up acidity is more apparent – now showing some legs/tears. Far off hints of pine, cedar, bark. The green woody notes cut the sweet, sugar, apple, and honey.

More: Resin, freesia, honey, butter, spice.

Empty glass: Honey, wet tanned hides, damp straw. Visible sediment.

Temperature definitely affects experience of cider. As bottle warms up more flavor and aroma qualities are apparent.

Future tastings should utilize beverage thermometer to test temperature of cider being reviewed to see how variations in temperature affect how cider is experienced.

Pairings – The Tasting Lab: None.

Overall Impressions: Sweet grass. Passing pleasing bitter notes. Intriguing perfume. Damp hay and barnyard. Resin, freesia, honey, butter, salt and stones.

Cider: ETIENNE DUPONT CIDRE BOUCHE´ BRUT DE NORMANDIE ORGANIC 2011

Maker: Domaine Dupont

Origin: Normandy, France  website: www.calvados-dupont.com

Importer: B. United International, Inc. website: www.bunitedint.com

ABV: 4.5%  Bottle: 750 ml, champagne cork

Style Notes:  USDA Organic. Unfiltered and unpasteurized. Made with naturally occurring yeasts. The fermentation is controlled by successive racking. Bottled between May and April. No sulfites added.

Fruit: Apples. 100% organically grown apples of the Bisquet, Joly Rouge, Douce Coet and Binet Rouge variety.

Makers Fruit Notes: The apples and the techniques used to make the cider are in conformity with American standards relating to organic agriculture, “N.O.P. Organic”. The apples are entirely untreated.

Note: Domaine Dupont labels each bottling with vintage year.

Makers Notes on Terrior:

www.calvados-dupont.com/en/orchards

The poor soils of the Pays d’Auge region, consisting of marl and chalky marl of the Oxfordian (secondary era) limit the growth of the trees and this leads to the production of small apples. The aromatic intensity is thereby increased and the ratio of skin to pulp helps to favour the extraction of tannins. Nitrogenous fertilisers (which swell the fruit by water retention) are not used – giving priority to quality rather than yield.

From Wikipedia:

Marl: Marl or marlstone is a calcium carbonate or lime-rich mud or mudstone which contains variable amounts of clays and silt. The dominant carbonate mineral in most marls is calcite, but other carbonate minerals such as aragonitedolomite, and siderite may be present. Marl was originally an old term loosely applied to a variety of materials, most of which occur as loose, earthy deposits consisting chiefly of an intimate mixture of clay and calcium carbonate, formed under freshwater conditions; specifically an earthy substance containing 35–65% clay and 65-35% carbonate.[1]  

  1. Pettijohn (1957), p. 410.

If you have tasting notes to add please leave a comment.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Malus domestica: Golden Russet. 1905, Arlington, Dutchess County, New York, United States

POM00001881

Malus domestica: Golden Russet

Artist:
Passmore, Deborah Griscom, 1840-1911
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Variety:
Golden Russet
Geographic origin:
Arlington, Dutchess County, New York, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 17 x 25 cm.
Specimen:
33402
Year:
1905
Notes on original:
Golden Russet of NY
Date created:
1905-02-27
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
Tagged , , , , ,

Aymak Djangaliev and Les Origines de la Pomme: A film by Catherine Peix

Les Origines de la Pomme

Documentary Film. In French.

Directed by: Catherine Peix   Written by: Catherine Peix

Produced by: Seppia, Kri-Kor Films   Website: Seppia   From the website:

“The film takes us into the mountains of Tian Shan in Kazakhstan where the first apple trees were born, 165 million years ago. Called Malus sieversii, they grow in thick forests of trees, all different from each other, some of them being three hundred years old and sometimes more than thirty meters high. Edible and delicious, in its shapes and colours, the wild apple Malus sieversii has this special characteristic of being naturally resistant to the traditional pathogens of the domestic apple, including apple scab.

Through a scientific and historical investigation, the film chronicles the life of a Kazakh scholar, Aymak Djangaliev, who devoted himself to studying and protecting this unique world heritage. It also highlights the contemporary issues brought up by the discovery of the apple of origins. Malus sieversii offers the possibility of a new fruit tree growing, requiring no pesticides: it represents a biodiversity which is essential to protect for the future generations.”

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Gleanings: Tian Shan: The Fatherland of Apples + Sweet Pilgrimage

POM00007358

Two informative articles about the wild apples of Tian Shan: The story of ancestral apples –Malus sieversii – and the great diversity occurring in the regions of Almaty, Kazakhstan, considered to be the birthplace of the apple.

Sweet Pilgrimage: Two British Apple Growers in the Tian Shan

by John Selborne

“Central Asia’s wild fruit forests are not only home to the ancestor of all domestic apples, but also hold the key to the future of apple breeding worldwide”

Published in Steppe, Issue 9, 2011. Available online.

The Fatherland of Apples

The origins of a favorite fruit and the race to save its native habitat.

By Gary Paul Nabhan

Published in the May/June 2008 issue of Orion magazine and available online.

“THE FRAGRANCE of the forest is unlike any I have ever known. The smell of ripening and rotting apples and pears fills my nostrils. At my feet, russet reds, blushing pinks, vibrant roses, and creamy yellows mottle the ground, where wildlife has half-consumed the wild fruit that makes this Kazakh forest so bountiful.”

Gary Paul Nabhan’s essay in Orion magazine is adapted from his book, Where Our Food Comes From, by Island Press, 2008

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Malus: Wild Apples of the Caucasus

Wild Apples of the Caucasus  pomological watercolor illustrations from The National Agricultural Library.

Image source: U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705

Tagged , , , , ,

Apple Sauced Cider’s Backyard Cider To Benefit Slow Food Russian River Apple Core Project

APPLE SAUCED LOGO

Date: March 19, 2013
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Sebastopol Cider Makers Rescue Backyard Apples for Charity

Sebastopol, CA (March 19, 2013) – Apple Sauced Cider™, a Sebastopol-grown cidery, is seeking local residents to donate apples from their backyard for a community cider blend called “Backyard” cider. Apple Sauced Cider will donate 100% of the profits from this batch of cider to Slow Food Russian River and its Apple Core project, which is responsible for raising awareness of and preserving the county’s apple heritage through marketing the region.

About “Backyard” Cider

As members of Slow Food Russian River and apple growers themselves, Hunter and Jolie Wade of Sebastopol’s Apple Sauced Cider aim to engage community members and give back by producing a “backyard” cider, a true expression of Sebastopol’s unique flavors. The cidery is looking for Sebastopol residents’ backyard apples to be donated and blended into a community cider. In the middle of August, the cidery invites all those who can donate to drop off early-season apple varieties, including gravensteins and others, into large bins at Devoto Gardens and Orchards in Sebastopol (Date TBA). The apples will be washed, pressed, fermented, and bottled by Apple Sauced Cider™ . The cidery will then donate 100% of the profits from this batch.

Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

What We’re Reading: Apples by Roger Yepsen

9780393036909_300

An extremely informative and charming small format book of deft watercolor illustrations and profiles of 90 apple varieties, Roger Yepsen’s Apples includes a concise overview of apple and cider history, recipes, Apple Argot, and simple how to make your own cider instructions.

See Inside the Book for a preview.

www.rogeryepsen.com

books.wwnorton.com 

Details: Hardcover, September 1994, ISBN 978-0-393-03690-9, 5.4 × 6.4 in / 255 pages

Tagged , , ,

Malus domestica: Red Gravenstein, 1929. Rosslyn, Arlington County, Virginia, United States

POM00003063

Malus domestica: Red Gravenstein

Artist:
Steadman, Royal Charles, b. 1875
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Variety:
Red Gravenstein
Geographic origin:
Rosslyn, Arlington County, Virginia, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 17 x 25 cm.
Specimen:
111014
Year:
1929
Notes on original:
Section J, Row 25, Tree 3; Picked 07/23/1929
Date created:
1929-08-07
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
Tagged , , , ,

5Ws of Cider: Scott Heath and Ellen Cavalli. Tilted Shed Ciderworks 2012 Graviva! Semidry Cider

5Ws of Cider: Scott Heath and Ellen Cavalli & Tilted Shed Ciderworks 2012 Graviva! Cider.

grav big red
Ellen Cavalli of Tilted Shed Ciderworks in Sonoma County, California answers our 5Ws of Cider pairing questions:

WHO: Scott Heath, co-owner & cidermaker, and Ellen Cavalli, co-owner & sales and marketing director.

WHAT:  Tilted Shed Ciderworks 2012 Graviva! Semidry Cider

Graviva! is our homage to the beleaguered, beautiful Gravenstein, which was Sonoma County’s main agricultural crop until post-WWII, when imported apples and eventually the wine industry put the squeeze on growers. Now there are around 600 acres left in cultivation, down from a few thousand just a couple of decades ago. It’s a blend of 50% Gravs with 50% heirloom and cider apples, including Hubbardston Nonesuch (a low-tannin, low-acid sweet from 1830s Massachusetts) and Nehou (a high-tannin, low-acid bittersweet from 1920s France), all organically grown on Sonoma County farms. It’s a lightly effervescent, bright, crisp cider with refreshing acidity, slight floral aroma, and a touch of sweetness and tannin.

We hand-washed, sorted, ground, and pressed the apples from August to October 2012 at our small cidery in west Sonoma County. Then Scott sent the juice onto a cool, slow fermentation in small batches until late March 2012. Our process is more akin to white wine production; the long fermentation allows the cider to develop more nuance and aromatics, which may be lost in a fast, hot ferment. Then Scott blended it, aged it for a month, then began bottling by hand. We released Graviva! in early May, for a total of 400 gallons.

WHAT TO PAIR WITH : Graviva! is fantastic as an aperitif, with cheeses (especially the sheep and cow dairy cheeses by our friends at Weirauch Farm & Creamery) and charcuterie. Its balance of acidity, sweetness, and tannin also makes it a great accompaniment to pork tenderloin, salmon, oysters, and spicy foods (especially curry dishes). I most like to pair it with is a hammock on a sunny day, but our most memorable pairing was with local salmon.
x
We serve it lightly chilled; 50 to 55 degrees is the sweet spot for releasing the aromatics.
x
WHEN & WHERE: The most memorable pairing we had with Graviva! was in late July 2012 at our house. Scott had just turned the Big 40, and we were three weeks away from launching our very first batches of ciders at Sebastopol’s Gravenstein Apple Fair. Early in the morning, Scott drove out to nearby Bodega Bay, where he bought a whole salmon straight off the fisherman’s boat. He smoked it in our wood smoker, and also made focaccia from scratch. Meanwhile, I picked and prepared a bunch of vegetables from our garden: cucumbers, carrots, green beans, and Sungold tomatoes. Our good friends and their kids came over, one friend brought the yummiest carrot cupcakes, we busted out a few as-yet-unlabeled bottles of Graviva! (we were still waiting to get the labels from the printer!), feasted on the best salmon we’ve ever had, and had a fun, noisy dinner party on our deck.

WHY: There is something inherently celebratory about Graviva! Not only did it make for a convivial dinner, it’s been poured instead of Champagne at weddings, and we recently served it on Mother’s Day as a toast to my  mom.

Graviva! label5-13X

To find out more:
Note: The lovely chicken pictured is a Rhode Island Red, and her name is Big Red.

 

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

5Ws of Cider: Tilted Shed Ciderworks 2012 Graviva! Semidry Cider

Graviva! label5-13X

The Second installment of The 5Ws of Cider:

The Featured Cider:

Tilted Shed Ciderworks 2012 Graviva! Semidry Cider

The Gravenstein sparkles in this bright, crisp cider. The refreshing acidity is balanced with a touch of sweetness. We sourced the Gravs and other heirloom cider apples for this blend from organic growers in the Sebastopol area. The Grav lends its lovely aromatics, while a mix of “bittersweet” apples—which were specially developed over the centuries for fermented cider—imparts lively tannins. This is Sonoma County heritage in a bottle. Viva la Grav!Great as an aperitif or celebratory bubbly, or pair with aged cheeses, spicy foods, and a hammock. Silver medal winner at the 2013 Great Lakes International Cider and Perry Competition.

2012 harvest

7% ABV

375 & 750 ml

Picture
Tagged , , , , , ,

The juice of the apple is naturally affected by the condition of the fruit itself. Sound words from the Encyclopedia Britannica 1911

cropped-observations.jpg

Fruit-growers who look to cider-making “as a means of utilizing windfalls and small and inferior apples of cooking and dessert varieties not worth sending to market” should be warned that it is as important to the cider industry that good cider only should be on sale as it is to the fruit-growing industry that good fruit only should be sent to market. The juice of the apple is naturally affected by the condition of the fruit itself, and if this be unripe, unsound or worm-eaten the cider made from it will be inferior to that made from full-grown, ripe and sound fruit. If such fruit be not good enough to send to market, neither will the cider made from it be good enough to place before the public. Nevertheless, it may furnish a sufficiently palatable drink for home consumption, and may therefore be so utilized. But when, as happens from time to time in fruit-growing districts, there is a glut, and even the best table fruit is not saleable at a profit, then, indeed, cider-making is a means of storing in a liquid form what would otherwise be left to rot on the ground; whilst if a proportion of vintage fruit were mixed therewith, a drink would be produced which would not discredit the cider trade, and would bring a fair return to the maker. (C. W. R. C.)

source: http://www.1911encyclopedia.org/Cider

Tagged , ,

Malus domestica: Apple Blossom: Subject Apple Frost Injury

POM00001279

Malus domestica

Artist:
Newton, Amanda Almira, ca. 1860-1943
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Geographic origin:
Woodwardville, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 17 x 24 cm.
NAL note:
Painting is of an apple blossom; Assigned specimen number
Specimen:
[00010]
Year:
1905
Notes on original:
Subject Apple Frost Injury. Apple blossoms from Woodwardville, Maryland. This shows the characteristic injury by frost which occurs when the apples are in bloom or in bud. The pistils and ovules being partly killed and the floral envelopes wholly uninjured. The stamens are mostly uninjured, some of the inner ones having gone down with the ovary. The youngest blossoms in bud at the time were not injured. The most advanced flowers were hurt the most.
Date created:
1905-04-24
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
Tagged , , , , , ,

Cider Review: Breezy Hill Orchard Barrel Tasting. Cider Salon: Six Samples and Ciders. Cider 52

Trained&PrunedAppleTree

Cider: (6) Various ciders and barrel samples.

Maker: Breezy Hill Orchard and Cider Mill

Origin: Staatsburg, New York

website: www.hudsonvalleycider.com

Fruit: Apple. Various orchards.

Cider Maker: Elizabeth Ryan


Cider: Hudson Valley Farmhouse Stone Ridge Scrumpy

Maker’s Style Notes: It’s alive! Fresh apple flavors and the aromas of yeast, some residual sugar, and natural carbonation in the bottle bring you a drink for all seasons. No sulfur, very unfiltered.

Our Impressions: A full round mouthfeel, yeast and honey aromas, apple syrup sweetness, effervescent.


Cider: Hudson Valley Farmhouse Farmhouse Cider

Maker’s Style Notes: American apple varieties grown in the Hudson Valley and a bit of sweetness make a refreshing beverage that can be sipped by itself or with a meal. No sulfur, not filtered.

Our Impressions: A favorite old friend that we always enjoy visiting. Zesty and alive, a refreshing anytime cider. Provokes rustic 18th century thoughts.

Cider: Hudson Valley Farmhouse Apple Seed Cider

Maker’s Style Notes: A blend of American and European cider apples creates rich, more complex aromas. Strong acidly like crisp white wine means you can pair this cider with any meal. Barrel samples, unfiltered.

Our Impressions:  Winey. Reminiscent of Sauvignon Blanc. Crisp and silky.

Cider: Hudson Valley Farmhouse Lady Apple Cider

Maker’s Style Notes: A single varietal. Unfiltered. Made by the ancient Pomme d’api. Brought by the Romans to England.

Our Impressions: Easy drinking. Mellow apple flavor. More sweet than tart but balanced. A fine lady indeed.

Cider: Dabinett Blend -Barrel Samples

Maker’s Style Notes: A beloved French variety. Complex flavors and more tannins. Unfiltered.

Our Impressions:  Pleasing subtle structure with soft tannins and a smooth light sweetness.

Cider: Ellis Bitter Blend – Barrel Samples

Maker’s Style Notes: A unique blend of bitter and acidic apples. Unfiltered.

Our Impressions: Complex and intense. A diverse array of bitter flavor elements are present more so than we have ever experienced as most commercially available ciders tend to have one or two bitter notes if any at all. Symphonic with lots of tannins and acid that support and supply structure. Delectably illustrates the concept of blending for structure and balance and unique fruit expression. Makes us curious to find out more about the old English cider apple, Ellis Bitter, used in this blend.

Note: All of these ciders and barrel samples were tasted May 10, 2013 at the Cider Salon hosted by Jimmy’s No. 43 to benefit Breezy Hill Orchard and Cider Mill and their campaign to raise funds to Rebuild Historic Cider House at Greenmarket Farm Breezy Hill. Find more about funding and rewards via Kickstarter.

Cider Knowledge: This type of tasting is a terrific way to get a glimpse into the growers and cidermakers process and learn a bit about how they approach fruit choices and utilize blending in the development of their fruit and cider portfolio.

Note on fruit sources: Elizabeth Ryan is the primary grower and principle cidermaker. Multiple orchards supply the fruit for these ciders.

 

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

IAMCIDER. Photographer Bill Bradshaw.

Screen Shot 2013-04-17 at 19.41.08
IAMCIDER. Photographer Bill Bradshaw.
x
If you know the world of cider, you are likely familiar with the work of UK-based photographer and author, IAMCIDER. Bill Bradshaw.
x
A professional photographer who began documenting cider culture in words and pictures as part of a 2004 project recording children’s experiences in orchards for local heritage initiative, Apple Villages, IAMCIDER explores “the fringes of the cider world through a lens”.
x
Visit his site to read more about the roots of IAMCIDER, and view his extensive collection of cider images.
x
When not capturing the world with his professional kit – he sometimes shoots with his phone. The deceptively easy and accessible qualities of ‘phoneography’, belie the craft of the shooter, while the simplicity and immediacy of the process enhance the ‘real-ness’ of these images, intimately engaging the viewer.
X
To find out more about IAMCIDER. Bill Bradshaw, and the many cider and apple projects he has in the works, including 3 upcoming cider books, visit these links:
IAMCIDER. Bill Bradshaw
Twitter:  @IAMCIDER
Skype:  the.bill.bradshaw
All images courtesy of the photographer. All images copyright © Bill Bradshaw
Tagged , , , , ,

Terminology: Defining The Fruit

061_medium

Defining the Fruit 

From The National Association Of Cider Makers “The voice of the UK’s cider makers”.

website: cideruk.com 

Cider apple varieties are divided into four categories according to the relative proportion of acidity and tannin:

Sweet varieties are the blandest of the four categories, being low in both components. They are useful to blend with ciders from the more strongly flavoured varieties, which, by themselves, would be too extreme in taste and aroma to be palatable. Typical examples of sweet apples are Sweet Coppin, in use to a small extent, and Court Royal which was used extensively at one time but rarely used nowadays.

Bittersweet apples impart the characteristic flavour of English ciders; as the name implies they are low in acid and high in tannin. The latter is responsible for two sensations on the palate – astringency and bitterness. In the bittersweet apple, there is a whole range of combinations of these two characteristics, varying from little astringency coupled with intense bitterness to very marked astringency coupled with mild bitterness. Typical bittersweets are Dabinett, Yarlington Mill and Tremlett’s Bitter.

Sharp varieties, so called because the predominant characteristic is that of acidity, are encountered less frequently today, possibly because culinary fruit, which has a similar flavour balance, can be substituted for this class. There are, however, recognised full sharp cider varieties, two of which are Crimson King and Brown’s Apple.

Bittersharp is the fourth class of cider apple. These are fairly high in acid and tannin, although the latter component does not show the wide range of flavours exhibited by the bittersweet.  Stoke Red is a good example.

Image: 1860s Cider Apples from The Herefordshire Pomona. Illustrations by Miss Ellis and Miss Bull.

Image and definitions courtesy of NACM. Used by permission.

Tagged , , , , , ,

Malus domestica: Russian Gravenstein, 1901. Maine.

Russian Gravenstein

Malus domestica: Russian Gravenstein

Artist:
Heiges, Bertha
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Variety:
Russian Gravenstein
Geographic origin:
Maine, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 17 x 25 cm.
Specimen:
22594
Year:
1901
Date created:
1901-09-28
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
Tagged , , , ,

Great Cider Starts With Great Fruit.

We Like Cider.

And you can’t really like cider without being fairly keen on apples.

To quote the esteemed makers at Farnum Hill Cider & Poverty Lane Orchards:

Anywhere, in any words, great cider starts with great fruit.”

We Like Apples.

Expect more about apples – orchards, pollinators, varietals, history, tastings, fruit expression.

We Are Apple Drinkers.*

LOC apple image

*A nice turn of phrase from the always interesting American Orchard.

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Cider Review: Farnum Hill Cider DOORYARD Batch 1202A: Cider52

FHillDooryard1202ACider: FARNUM HILL CIDER DOORYARD BATCH 1202A

Maker: Farnum Hill Cider & Poverty Lane Orchards   Origin:  Lebanon, New Hampshire

website: www.povertylaneorchards.com

ABV: 7.5%  Bottle: 750 ml, champagne cork

Makers Style Notes: What ARE Dooryard ciders?  “Lovely cider batches” that departed too much from the flavor profiles of established Farnum Hill Cider blends. The ongoing Dooryard series: experimental ciders, ranging from bittersweet to superfruity, that sell out quickly, never to be made again. “It’s a veritable feast of the weird and the wild,” according to Steve Wood, one of Farnum Hill Ciders founding makers.

Bonus Feature: Each keg or bottle of Dooryard Cider is marked with a batch number, allowing you to look up  the details of  your specific batches apples, blend, and tasting notes. It’s a glimpse behind the making process at Farnum Hill Cider, and a chance to read more about the people, processes, and  ideas involved in creating your batch of Dooryard Cider.

Fruit: Apples.

Cider Maker: Nicole LeGrand Leibon.

Makers Notes: Dooryard #1202A

Dooryard 12o2A jumps away from the ‘rowdier tannins’ that we forecast for the Dooryard tribe. The fruit notes cluster mostly in the peachy plummy stone-fruit family, but without sweetness. Prominent is a long smooth savory ‘umami’ woven throughout 1202A’s aromas and flavors, pleasurably escorting the many acid, bitter, fruity, and woodsy notes that carry into the finish. But tannic bite and astringent pucker? Not really. So much for generalizations”.

Our Tasting Notes: 

In The Glass: Dooryard 1202A is clear, bright, shining, pale gold, with a faint green tinge.

Aroma & Flavour:: Fresh dessert apple, green apple, tropical fruits, pineapple. Cider is full of “zing” with a tart crisp tannin balance.

-Ed. Note: When sampling, Farnum Hill Cider often gets short shrift as it is the cider we tend to chat over instead of review in a focused fashion. We decided that this indicates a very successful cider, as it inspires such conviviality.

Our Pairing-The Tasting Lab: We tried Farnum Hill Dooryard Batch 1202A with a variety of foods, including raw greens and brussel sprouts, a pairing that heightened the perceived experience of  the ciders ‘sweetness’ and highlighted its inherent complexity. The raw brussel sprouts also benefited from the pairing, exhibiting delightful flavor complexity previously unnoticed in the little brassicas.

For a handy reference (with recipes), and an aid to studying the vegetable kingdom and understanding the relationships within botanical families see: Vegetable Literacy by Deborah Madison.

(See our The Farm on Adderley: Cider in Context review for our thoughts on the match of American craft cider with roots and earthy vegetables)

We like this cider very much with food or alone.

Cheesemonger’s Notes: Cypress Grove Purple Haze- a fresh chèvre made with fennel pollen and lavender livens up the already bright flavors in the cider and rounds out the whole experience by providing a hint of sweetness.  Avoid Blues or other intense cheeses (aged Goudas, Cheddars, Parms) as they overpower the soft fruit flavors of 1202A.

Overall Impressions: We are always happy with a glass or bottle of Farnum Hill Cider. The Dooryard series, while divergent from the brands standard profiles, never disappoints. Consistent quality, finely crafted. Too good not to share.

Drinking the Farnum Hill DOORYARD series regularly can be a great cider education tool. Farnum Hill Cider’s decision to save cider blends that step outside of their established commercial brand profiles and sell  Dooryards as unique one of a kind batches is an interesting example of real, classic,  American style craft cider. Each batch reflecting variations in methodology, fruit available, and blending options. By posting tasting notes online for each specific Dooryard batch, Farnum Hill allows the cider explorer to understand how and why these  flavor profiles deviate from their “standard” blends (Extra Dry, Semi-Dry, Farmhouse) and furthers our comprehension of the standard blends themselves. What are the characteristics of a Farmhouse? What differentiates this from an Extra Dry or Semi-Dry? Enjoy Dooryards often to taste the answers to these questions and keep up with the happenings at Poverty Lane.

Further reading:  A Visit to Farnum Hill Ciders (NH): Watching Art Being Made from the blog East Coast Wineries.

If you have tasting notes to add please leave a comment.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Caption: Apples are one of the main fruit crops along the Rio Pueblo at Dixon, New Mexico. 1940

8b25707r

We use this Russell Lee image from The Library of Congress often as a detail and graphic element in our posts. Here it is presented complete and with links and record details.

Apples are one of the main fruit crops along the Rio Pueblo at Dixon, New Mexico

Creator(s): Lee, Russell, 1903-1986, photographer

Site: Prints & Photographs

Original Format: Photo, Print, Drawing

Date: July, 1940

Collections:Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information Black-and-White Negatives

Part of: Farm Security Administration – Office of War Information Photograph Collection (Library of Congress)

Credit Line: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection,

Call Number: LC-USF34- 037108-D [P&P]

Repository: Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division Washington, DC 20540 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

Tagged , , , , ,

The Unpublished Atlas: A List of Apples. A View of the Cultivation of Fruit Trees by William Coxe.

Images of the 24 pomological watercolor illustrations, on 12 plates, listed below, are posted on at USDA National Agricultural Library website in the Rare Books Special Collections Image GalleryThe complete Atlas is digitized, but not all images from the Atlas are currently available in Rare Books Special Collections Image Gallery.
The originals are full size watercolor illustrations on Bristol board, created by Elizabeth Coxe McMurtry and her sisters to illustrate the unpublished second edition of their father’s book.
It is possible these images were painted circa 1817-1831, making them some of the earliest known color pomological illustrations of American fruits. An 1857 article in Country Gentleman magazine describes the watercolor illustrations in detail, indicating they were executed prior to that date.
Pomological illustrations currently on view online, as thumbnails, in the Rare Books Special Collections Image Gallery:
Note: The Atlas contains many more illustrations. The images posted are only a selection.
Apples:
Domini
Hewe’s Crab
Roane’s White Crab
Orange Apple
Grey House
Winesap
Harrison
Pomme d’Apis or Lady Apple
Poveshon
Siberian Crab
Styre
Loan’s English Pearmain
Rambo or Romanite
The Cider Apple
The Black Apple
White Sweet or Wheterills White Sweeting
Glouschester White
Fearn’s Pippin
Newton Pippin
Preistly
Esopus Spitzenburg
Vendervere
Fama Gusta
Peaches:
Red-Cheek Malacotan
Early Anne
Monstrous Pavie
Tagged , , , ,

Heroes of Cider: Pomologist William Coxe, Jr. Of Burlington, NJ (1762-1831)

Historical or Biographical Sketch:

William Coxe (1762-1831), a pomologist, was one of the foremost fruit growers in America who experimented with new varieties of fruits at his home in Burlington, New Jersey. He collected specimens from the United States and abroad. A View of the Cultivation of Fruit Trees in America is a classic of American pomological literature. It is considered by many specialists as the illustrative evidence of fruit culture during the colonial and revolutionary period of the new American nation.”

source: Special Collections, National Agricultural Library

The full title of his masterwork:

A View of the Cultivation of Fruit Trees, and the Management of Orchards and Cider: with accurate descriptions of the most estimable varieties of native and foreign apples, pears, peaches, plums, and cherries, cultivated in the middle states of America : illustrated by cuts of two hundred kinds of fruits of the natural size : intended to explain some of the errors which exist relative to the origin, popular names, and character of many of our fruits, to identify them by accurate descriptions of their properties and correct delineations of the full size and natural formation of each variety, and to exhibit a system of practice adapted to our climate, in the successive stages of a nursery, orchard, and cider establishment.

His book can be found and read online via google books and archive.org.

He was also a Statesmen. Entry for William Coxe Jr. Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774-2005:

“He was a Representative from New Jersey; born in Burlington, N.J., May 3, 1762; served as a member of the State general assembly 1796-1804, 1806-1809, and again in 1816 and 1817; served as speaker 1798-1800 and again in 1802; elected as a Federalist to the Thirteenth Congress (March 4, 1813-March 3, 1815); author; died in Burlington, Burlington County, N.J., on February 25, 1831; interment in St. Mary’s Churchyard.”

He also had a national reputation for his cider, at an age when it was a famous and characteristic beverage” this according to  Proceedings of the State Horticultural Society at Its Annual Session, Volume 42 , New Jersey State Horticultural Society, 1917.

No. 83

Tagged , , , , ,

Inside Cider: Regarding Cider Apple Terminology

LOC apple image

More USEFUL TERMS regarding Cider Apples:

TANNINS: bitter, astringent substances found in some apples. They give bitterness & complex, earthly flavors, plus drying, tautening, & body in the “mouthfeel”.

ACIDS: sour-tasting, or ‘sharp’ substances found in apples. Acids give a refreshing sourness, bright flavor, & a keen, mouth-watering “feel’. To ferment cleanly, raw cider juice needs a strong acid content.

SUGARS: sweet-tasting substances found in apples. Yeast ferments natural fruit sugars into alcohol.

CIDER APPLES: apple varieties that produce superior juice for fermenting. Like wine grapes, cider apples often taste bad. They can be super-bitter, super-sour, sickly-sweet, dry soft or any combination of the above. When a good eating apple works well for cider, or vice-versa, it is prized by Farnum Hill Cider & Poverty Lane Orchard’s as a ‘cross over’.

BITTERSWEETS: a class of cider apple varieties valued for high tannin content & high sugar content.

SWEETS: apple varieties grown for high sugar alone.

BITTERSHARPS: a class of cider apple varieties valued for high tannin content & high acid content.

SHARPS: apple varieties grown for high acid alone.

Adapted from Farnum Hill Cider & Poverty Lane Orchards booklet Inside Cider: Fast Facts for Wholesalers, Retailers, and Aficionados from Farnum Hill Cider © copyright Poverty Lane Orchards 2011. All Rights Reserved. Used by permission.

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Discover the Craft of Documentary Food Photographer Clare Barboza.

harmony2

Clare Barboza is a Seattle-based visual artist and documentary food photographer focused on capturing the telling details that illuminate the stories behind what we eat, make, raise, and grow.

Her evocative images are featured in Rowan Jacobsen’s upcoming book, Uncommon Apples. Glimpse a few portraits of these unique apples: Knobbed Russet, Blue Pearmain, and wild Khazhaks – here. Clare discusses her experiences shooting the book, and shares beautiful pome fruit images, in her blog post a whole lotta apples.

Enjoy the images Clare graciously shared with us, and explore her work further at ClareBarboza.com

i

i

Image: Harmony Orchards

All images courtesy of the photographer. All images copyright © Clare Barboza.

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Malus domestica: Red Gravenstein, 1897. Wolfville, Kings County, Nova Scotia, Canada.

POM00003059wolfvilleMalus domestica: Red Gravenstein

Artist:
Passmore, Deborah Griscom, 1840-1911
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Variety:
Red Gravenstein
Geographic origin:
Wolfville, Kings County, Nova Scotia, Canada
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 16 x 25 cm.
Specimen:
14844
Year:
1897
Notes on original:
From Grafts
Date created:
1897-12-21
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
Tagged , , , ,

What is a Sport: Darwin, Mutants, Apples & The Red Gravenstein.

LOC apple image

SPORT: 

Spontaneous somatic mutation and mutant cultivars.

Mutations are often called bud variations, bud mutations, somatic mutations, bud sports or briefly, sports.

Darwin (1868) defined bud variations as ‘all changes in structure or appearance which occasionally occur in full-grown plants in their flower-buds or leaf buds’ and in many cases ascribed these ‘changes’ to ‘spontaneous variability.’

source: Mutation Breeding: Theory and Practical Applications 1988

A. M. van Harten, Agricultural University, Wageningen, The Netherlands

SPORT:

A sudden variation in habit of growth or blossom color from the rest of the plant or others plants of its kind. Caused by a genetic change that may be accidental or spontaneous, or intentionally induced.

source: www.botany.com

SPORT: 

In botany, a sport or bud sport is a part of a plant that shows morphological differences from the rest of the plant. Sports may differ by foliage shape or color, flowers, or branch structure. Sports with desirable characteristics are often propagated vegetatively to form new cultivars that retain the characteristics of the new morphology.

source: wikipedia.org

See: Red Gravenstein. This variety is a sport (natural genetic mutation) of the Gravenstein apple.

Species: Malus domestica. Parentage: Sport of Gravenstein. Origin: Washington, United States.

source: orangepippin.com

Tagged , , , , , ,

Malus domestica: Red Gravenstein, 1935. Geneva, Ontario County, New York, United States.

POM00003062REDGrav1910NY

Malus domestica: Red Gravenstein

Artist:
Arnold, Mary Daisy, ca. 1873-1955
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Variety:
Red Gravenstein
Geographic origin:
Geneva, Ontario County, New York, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 17 x 25 cm.
Specimen:
113201
Year:
1935
Date created:
1935-12
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
Tagged , , ,

Malus domestica: Red Gravenstein, 1931. Rosslyn, Arlington County, Virginia, United States.

POM00003064RedGrav VA1931

Malus domestica: Red Gravenstein

Artist:
Steadman, Royal Charles, b. 1875
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Variety:
Red Gravenstein
Geographic origin:
Rosslyn, Arlington County, Virginia, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 17 x 25 cm.
Specimen:
8131931
Year:
1931
Notes on original:
Section J, Row 25, Tree 3
Date created:
1931-08-18
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
Tagged , , ,

Malus domestica: Red Gravenstein, 1909. Olga, San Juan County, Washington, United States.

POM00003060RedGrav

Malus domestica: Red Gravenstein

Artist:
Passmore, Deborah Griscom, 1840-1911
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Variety:
Red Gravenstein
Geographic origin:
Olga, San Juan County, Washington, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 17 x 25 cm.
Specimen:
45883
Year:
1909
Date created:
1909-12-03
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
Tagged , , ,

Malus domestica: Gravenstein. Rosslyn, Arlington County, Virginia, United States.

POM00002051Gravenstein,Rosslyn #2

Malus domestica: Gravenstein

Artist:
Arnold, Mary Daisy, ca. 1873-1955
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Variety:
Gravenstein
Geographic origin:
Rosslyn, Arlington County, Virginia, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 17 x 25 cm.
Specimen:
112286
Year:
1931
Notes on original:
Section J, Row 23-24, Tree 5
Date created:
1931-09-15
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
Tagged , , , , , ,

Pomme Fruit of The Month: Malus domestica: Gravenstein

POM00002051

Pomme Fruit of The Month: Malus domestica: Gravenstein.

April 2013 feature: The Gravenstein Apple.

An apple profile: origin, history, lore, fruit expression, statistics, and pomologicial art.

Tagged , ,

Malus domestica: Gravenstein. Rosslyn, Arlington County, Virginia, United States.

POM00002050Rosslyn, VAjpg

Malus domestica: Gravenstein

Artist:
Arnold, Mary Daisy, ca. 1873-1955
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Variety:
Gravenstein
Geographic origin:
Rosslyn, Arlington County, Virginia, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 17 x 25 cm.
Specimen:
106589
Year:
1925
Notes on original:
Access Number 8581; Section J, Row 23, Tree 5
Date created:
1925-08-17
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
Tagged , , , , ,

Malus domestica: Gravenstein. Truro, Nova Scotia, Canada.

POM00002053GravensteinNoveScotia

Malus domestica: Gravenstein

Artist:
Newton, Amanda Almira, ca. 1860-1943
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Variety:
Gravenstein
Geographic origin:
Truro, Nova Scotia, Canada
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 17 x 25 cm.
Specimen:
35381
Year:
1905
Date created:
1905-11-29
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
Tagged , , , , ,

5Ws of Cider: Jolie Devoto Wade & Apple Sauced Cider 2012 “Save the Gravenstein” Original

5Ws of Cider: Jolie Devoto Wade & Apple Sauced Cider 2012 “Save the Gravenstein” Original 

Hunter Wade of Apple Sauced Cider in Sebastopol, California answers our 5Ws of Cider pairing questions:
APPLE SAUCED LOGO
  • WHO: Jolie Devoto Wade, the farmer’s daughter and cidermaker.
  • WHAT: 2012 “Save the Gravenstein” Original. Crisp, tangy, acidic. Goes down exceptionally smooth. The secret: we grow all of our apples that we use, and we grow for flavor, not for quantity. The dry-farmed certified organic Gravensteins that “sweat” for a few days possess a wonderful aroma that comes through in the taste of the cider. Also, we’re tasting Sonoma County’s heritage apple in a glass. Jolie loves pairing the cider with our weekly catch of fish tacos, always made with a zesty slaw, fresh halibut or salmon, and a mean avocado salsa. Also great with meats and sharp cheeses.
  • WHERE: Anywhere with food.
  • WHEN: Since this cider is super food friendly, think lunch or dinner. But also, pop a bottle on the top of a hike, even if it’s in the morning. There have been too many times when we really could’ve used a nice refreshing drink of cider, and we had no bottle in hand. Next time.
  •  WHY: Jolie likes this pairing because it is a satisfying protein-rich meal, that wouldn’t be the same without the cider. She always says, “the cider fills in the cracks,” rather than “the cider opens up the stomach.” Our zesty tacos pair well with the clean crispness and smooth finish of the cider. Honestly the most food-friendly cider we’ve ever drunk.
To find out more:
IMG_0195AppleSauced
Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

5Ws of Cider: The Cider: Apple Sauced Cider 2012 “Save the Gravenstein” Original and Devoto Orchards

5Ws of Cider: Jolie Devoto Wade & Apple Sauced Cider

2012 “Save the Gravenstein” Original 

APPLE SAUCED LOGO

Apple Sauced Cider 2012 “Save the Gravenstein” Original

CIDER MAKERS NOTES: 100% Gravenstein, Single Varietal Cider. Made from 100% Gravenstein apples, an heirloom apple variety that our county was once famous for but is now disappearing as the orchards are being pulled out and replaced with wine grapes. So we are calling it “SAVE THE GRAVENSTEIN” as part of our mission is to increase awareness for the variety. 22oz bottles, 6% ALC/VOL, 672 cases produced.

To find out more:
Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Malus domestica: Gravenstein. Albermarle County, Virginia, United States.

POM00002052

Malus domestica: Gravenstein

Artist:
Newton, Amanda Almira, ca. 1860-1943
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Variety:
Gravenstein
Geographic origin:
Albermarle County, Virginia, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 17 x 25 cm.
Specimen:
44075
Year:
1909
Date created:
1909-08-16
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
Tagged , , , , ,
%d bloggers like this: