A Bit About Wassailing.

The Wassail (Charles Rennie Mackintosh)About Wassailing From the National Association of Cider Makers:

“Wassailing is the chief custom associated with cider apple trees. The word wassail is derived from the Anglo Saxon ‘wes hal’ meaning ‘good health’ or ‘be whole’. The earliest written records of wassailing date from the late 17th century.

This custom is performed to protect the trees from evil spirits and to make them bear a plentiful crop and is still carried out in the West of England. The rite involves five main elements: gathering around an apple tree, singing the Wassailing song, pouring cider over the tree’s roots, loud noises and a toast.

The pouring of cider over the roots symbolised the carrying forward of the life juice of the tree from one year to the next. It was also the custom to place a cider-soaked piece of toasted bread in the fork of the tree to attract good spirits while guns were fired into the trees so as to frighten away the evil spirits. The health of the tree would then be drunk as often as was felt necessary. Nowadays, it is traditional to hold the rite on Twelfth Night.

Over time, the custom was adapted and added to, so that each area had its own variation. The date for instance varied, and old tea kettles and tin trays might be clattered together to scare away the spirits instead of firing guns. In Herefordshire it was traditional for Morris Men to take part by dancing around the trees.”

Source: National Association of Cider Makers.

Link: www.cideruk.com

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A Call To Wassail. January 5th -17th, 2014.

The Wassail (Charles Rennie Mackintosh)

A Call To Wassail. January 5th – 17th, 2014.

Hello Friends of Cider!

We ask YOU the cider community to join us in embracing Wassail in 2014.

What is Wassail?

Wikipedia:

“The Orchard-Visiting wassail refers to the ancient custom of visiting orchards in cider-producing regions of England, reciting incantations and singing to the trees to promote a good harvest for the coming year.”

Herefordshire Times:

“Steeped in history, wassailing is traditionally held on the Twelfth Night after Christmas and performed in orchards to awaken the apple trees from their winter slumber and ward off bad spirits.”

When is Wassail?

We propose to observe North American celebrations from January 5th to  January 17th, 2014. (‘New’ 12th Night Eve to ‘Old’ 12th Night – more about that later).

Goals for the 2014 Wassail:

Explore Old & New World Wassail Traditions

Salute The Orchard

Honor The Apple

Celebrate With Cider

How Can You Wassail?

Enjoy cider and a wassail bowl with friends.

Visit an orchard, cidermaker or local cider-serving establishment and toast the orchard & the apple.

Host a Wassail Event.

Let us know if you plan an event – we’ll post it on our Wassail 2014 page.

The 2014 Wassail Theme: Discover Wassail.

We hope this will be an informal collaborative effort and an annual event for the growing cider community in North America.

The Wassail (Charles Rennie Mackintosh)

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Views from New Amsterdam Winter Market 2013

Images of floral beauty taken at the stall of, and garland making demonstration lead by, Emily Thompson of Emily Thompson Flowers www.emilythompsonflowers.com

Thank You to Rowan Imports for cider, and to Sterling Publishing, Countryman Press, Storey Publishing, Timber Press, Ten Speed Press, Chelsea Green Publishing, Johns Hopkins University Press, and Running Press for all the wonderful books included in our raffle gift baskets for the November & December Markets. Thank You All for helping us support New Amsterdam Market and share the cider joy.

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Events: NYC: New Amsterdam Winter Market and 8th Anniversary Celebration

New Amsterdam Market Winter Market & 8th Anniversary is December 15, 2013.

“Featuring over 60 regional food artisans, purveyors, market fare and handcrafted goods. From holiday wreaths, garlands, tools and ornaments for home decor to holiday treats, latkes, sweets, baked goods and gifts.”

To celebrate New Amsterdam Market’s 8th Anniversary we coordinated 3 amazing gift baskets (for yourself or for gift giving) containing some of our favorite books AND some terrific ciders. Support the Market with a raffle ticket or two, and you could be the lucky winner of one of these swell books & cider baskets.

Each basket comes with a selection of ciders of the world donated by Rowan Imports.

Cider Enthusiasts Selection:

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Books: Worlds Best Ciders by Pete Brown and Bill Bradshaw, Sterling Publishing, 2013

Cider Hard & Sweet by Ben Watson, Countryman Press, 3rd Edition, 2013 and

Cider: Making, Using & Enjoying Sweet & Hard Cider, 3rd Edition by Lew Nichols, Annie Proulx, Storey Publishing, 3rd Edition

Apple & Cider Aficionados Selection:

Books: Worlds Best Ciders by Pete Brown and Bill Bradshaw, Sterling, 2013 and

Apples of North America: 192 Exceptional Varieties for Gardeners, Growers, and Cooks by Tom Burford, Timber Press, 2013.

NYC Food Culture Selection:

Books: I Love New York: Ingredients and Recipes by Daniel Humm, Will Guidara, Ten Speed Press, 2013 and

New York a la Cart: Recipes and Stories from the Big Apple’s Best Food Trucks by Siobhan Wallace and Alexandra Penfold, Running Press; 2013.

Celebrate 8 years of New Amsterdam Market, and support the revival of the historic Old Fulton Fish Market.

Links:

New Amsterdam Market newamsterdammarket.org

Rowan Imports rowanimports.com

 

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Mixology: The Buffalo Gold Cocktail. Brookville Restaurant, Charlottesville, Virginia.

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Virginia Pippin Gold Cider (with Virginia apple brandy) Meet Kentucky’s Buffalo Trace Bourbon.

Virginia knows how to make a cider cocktail. One of our favorites, (enjoyed with Brookville’s deliciously addicting bacon fat popcorn):

The Cocktail: The Buffalo Gold.

The Venue: Brookville Restaurant, Charlottesville, Virginia.
The Cider: Foggy Ridge Cider Pippin Gold.
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The recipe is as follows:
Iced highball glass
1 1/2 oz. Buffalo Trace Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey
1 1/2 oz Foggy Ridge Cider Pippin Gold
long squeeze grenadine
Fill with your favorite ginger ale
Garnish with a cherry
 
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Foggy Ridge Cider Makers Tasting Notes for Pippin Gold:
Pippin Gold is a unique blend of 100% Newtown Pippin hard cider and apple brandy from Laird and Company, the country’s oldest distiller. Pippin Gold is delicious as a dessert cider or sweet apéritif. Some have swooned over peaches soaked in Pippin Gold served with homemade pound cake.
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Links:
Brookville Restaurant: www.brookvillerestaurant.com
Foggy Ridge Cider: www.foggyridgecider.com
Laird & Company: www.lairdandcompany.com
Buffalo Trace Distillery: www.buffalotracedistillery.com
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Image: Malus domestica: Yellow Newtown. Charlottesville, Virginia, 1904.
Artist: Deborah Griscom Passmore
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705
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Smith, Jones, Plumb and Penn.

Smith, Jones, Plumb and Penn. Cider Apples of Yesteryear.

The National Agricultural Library’s collection of pomological watercolor illustrations includes images of cider apples of renown such as the Harrison, Virginia or Hewe’s Crab, Ablemarle and Newtown Pippins.

Also documented by the artists working for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Division of Pomology are less well-known American cider apples such as the Smith Cider,  Jones Cider, Plumb Cider and the Penn Cider.

Image credit: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”

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Malus domestica: Smith Cider, Rosslyn, Arlington County, Virginia, 1932

Malus domestica: Smith Cider

Malus domestica: Smith Cider

Malus domestica: Smith Cider

Artist:
Arnold, Mary Daisy, ca. 1873-1955
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Variety:
Smith Cider
Geographic origin:
Rosslyn, Arlington County, Virginia, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 17 x 25 cm.
Specimen:
112350
Year:
1932
Notes on original:
Section J, Row 17, Tree 3
Date created:
1932-01-30
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
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Celebrate Repeal Day®: Drink a Cider.

Repeal Day® Is December 5.

The motto:

The Freedom To Celebrate. Celebrate The Freedom.

Read more about Repeal Day®  and suggested activities at www.repealday.org

We Suggest A Fine Way To Celebrate Repeal Day®: Drink a Cider.

Read the fascinating Analysis of the U. S. Liquor Industry during Prohibition originally published in Fortune Magazine: U.S. Liquor Industry (Fortune 1931)

Suggested Accompaniment: A Glass of Cider.

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Cider is one of the good gifts which are to be received with thanksgiving.

WPA October

We therefore believe that cider is one of the good gifts which are to be received with thanksgiving; and we desire to see its manufacture so perfected, that it will rank with wine in public estimation: and if our experience can add to the stock of information on this subject, we cheerfully give it, though we may encounter the reprobation of some ultra abstinence, not to say, temperance men.

From: Tilton’s Journal of Horticulture, Volume 5, J. E. Tilton & Company, 1869.

To read more about Cider and Cider-Manufacture, see Tilton’s Journal of Horticulture, Volume 5.

WPA November

Image credit:  October. Leslie Bryan Burroughs. [1938]. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, WPA Poster Collection, Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-7683.

November. Ben Kaplan. [1938]. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, WPA Poster Collection, Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-7684.

 

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The State of Cider: New York: New Amsterdam Market Cider Revival!

Celebrate the 3rd Annual Cider Revival at New Amsterdam Market, Sunday November 24, 2013 from 11 AM to 5PM.

The Final Event of Cider Week NY: Enjoy cider tastings with New York cidermakers , including: Blackbird CidersBreezy Hill OrchardDocs Hard CiderOrchard Hill Cider Mill and Sovereign Cider.

And a Cider Library collection of wonderful cider & apple books (pictured) will be raffled with all proceeds to benefit New Amsterdam Market.

From the New Amsterdam Market website:

On Sunday November 24, New Amsterdam Market will host the Third Annual New York State Cider Revival in collaboration with Glynwood, a continuation of Cider Week. The event will feature New York hard cider makers, reviving a century’s old tradition of the fermented beverage. Once one of the most popular beverages of New York, hard cider faced a quick demise as Prohibition ended legal sales. As cider orchards transformed into traditional apple orchards, the number of farmstead and craft ciders drastically reduced. Join us in celebrating the return of this historic drink, with numerous tasting and pairing from select vendors. The perfect accompaniment for your Thanksgiving meal.

In addition, our November 24th market will stock all your holiday essentials- from pies to poultry!

Join the Cider Revival

&

Support New Amsterdam Market

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Celebrate the New York Cider Revival and Win Your Own Cider Library!

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It’s The 3rd Annual Cider Revival at the New Amsterdam Market in New York City Sunday, November 24.

Visit The New York State Cider & Thanksgiving Market for a chance to win Your Own Cider Library AND Support The New Amsterdam Market.

Enter to win an amazing Cider Research & Reference Library – several publishers have generously donated some terrific books – perfect for the cider & apple lover or the cider curious. For yourself or for gift giving.

WAIT There’s MORE!

The Cider Research & Reference Library includes a few bottles of real New York cider!

Stop by the main Market table on Sunday Nov. 24th, and enter to win The Cider Library with Libations! Tickets $5 each or $10 for 3. Such value! and for a good cause.

All proceeds to benefit The New Amsterdam Market.

Take a look at the books included in the Cider (and Apple) Research & Reference Library:

Cider Hard & Sweet: History, Traditions, and Making Your Own 3rd Edition by Ben Watson, The Countryman Press, 2013.

Cider Hard & Sweet

Taste, Memory: Forgotten Foods, Lost Flavors, and Why They Matter by David Buchanan, Chelsea Green Publishing, 2012.

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The New Cider Makers Handbook: A Comprehensive Guide for Craft Producers by Claude Jolicoeur, Chelsea Green Publishing, 2013.

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The Drunken Botanist by Amy Stewart, Algonquin Books, 2013.

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Worlds Best Ciders by Pete Brown & Bill Bradshaw, Sterling Epicure, 2013.

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Apples of North America: 192 Exceptional Varieties for Gardeners, Growers, and Cooks by Tom Burford, Timber Press, 2013.

True Brews: How to Craft Fermented Cider, Beer, Wine, Sake, Soda, Mead, Kefir, and Kombucha at Home by Emma Christensen, 10 Speed Press, 2013.

True Brews Cover

Johnny Appleseed And The American Orchard: A Cultural History by William Kerrigan, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012.

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Apple Lovers Cookbook by Amy Traverso, W. W. Norton & Company, 2011.

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Cider Handbook from Scott Labs, 2013.

Scott 2013-14

Stop by the New Amsterdam Market this Sunday, November 24th, to celebrate the New York Cider Revival, enter to win this swell cider library, and get your holiday marketing done.

Link: newamsterdammarket.com

Directions: newamsterdammarket.com/map.html

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Celebrate The 3rd Annual New York Cider Revival at The New Amsterdam Market

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It’s The 3rd Annual New York Cider Revival at the New Amsterdam Market in New York City this Sunday, November 24, 2013 from 11AM – 5PM.

Visit The New York State Cider & Thanksgiving Market for A Chance to Win Your Own Cider Library AND Support The New Amsterdam Market.

Several New York Cidermakers will be in attendance, including: Blackbird CidersBreezy Hill OrchardDocs Hard CiderOrchard Hill Cider Mill and Sovereign Cider. Meet The Cidermakers & enjoy some cider. See the full list of vendors at The New Amsterdam Market website here.

Link: newamsterdammarket.com

Directions: newamsterdammarket.com/map.html

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A Cider And Apple Stand On The Lee Highway, Shenandoah National Park, Virginia 1935

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Photographer: Rothstein, Arthur – United States. Resettlement Administration

Credit Line: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection, [reproduction number, LC-DIG-fsa-8a07722 (digital file from original neg.) LC-USF33-T01-002196-M3 (b&w film dup. neg., 70mm size) LC-USF3301-002196-M3 (b&w film dup. neg., 4×5 size)]

For more Virginia Cider 2013 Visit: CIDER WEEK VA ciderweekva.com

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What We’re Reading: The Drunken Botanist by Amy Stewart

Drunken-Botanist-Cover-low-res

What We’re Reading: The Drunken Botanist. The Plants That Create The World’s Great Drinks.

Algonquin Books, 2013.

Author: Amy Stewart

Exploring botany in a bottle, plant by fascinating plant, with cocktail recipes. Organized by process and botanical families, and styled with a nod to antique tomes, chapter headings include:

Part One: We Explore The Twin Alchemical Processes of Fermentation and Distillation from Which Wine, Beer and Spirits Issue Forth.

The entry for Apple, Malus domestica, Rosaceae (Rose Family) – includes a discussion of cider, notes regarding heritage apples, outlines apple spirit styles, and provides cocktail recipes with history notes. Pear, Pyrus communis, perry and pear spirits are examined as well.

Full of fun facts to know and tell, with Grow Your Own and Field Guide sections, and a diverse array of recipes.

This is the kind of reading you can easily enjoy with a glass of cider; educational, informative, and amusing – a very handy imbibers reference guide indeed.

Visit: drunkenbotanist.com

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Cider Mixology: The Whiskey Smash! Millstone Cellars Blossom Cider in A Woodberry Kitchen Cocktail

WK Wiskey Smash!

Cider Mixology: Whiskey Smash!  Millstone Cellars Blossom Cider at Woodberry Kitchen.

Wending our way back to New York from Virginia – with precious cider cargo in tow – we stopped for refreshment at Woodberry Kitchen, located in a refurbished 19th century mill complex outside of downtown Baltimore. 

Woodberry Kitchen bar artisans embrace the charms of cider, allowing us to start the evening properly with a cider cocktail, The Whisky Smash! 

Mixologist C. Connor Rasmussen, kindly shared the recipe.

The WHISKEY SMASH! How To:

A wonderful cocktail wherein we substitute the more traditional bubbly wine for the sparkling cider:
1.75 bourbon (above 90 proof)
.75 lemon (fresh squeezed)
.5 honey syrup (89% honey to water)
Shake everything up and pour over rocks with a dash of bitters and top with the sparkling cider!
Garnish with a fresh rosemary sprig.
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To Start: The Whiskey Smash! and yellow wax peppers on toasts charred in the wood-fired brick oven.
To Follow: An extremely delicious and seriously local meal.
Accompanied By: Regional ciders at every turn.
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Read a bit about Woodberry Kitchen (here).

For another cider cocktail from Woodberry Kitchen, with MIllstone Ciderberry Cider, see The Brewer & Keep Cocktail.

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SNAPSHOT: 50 STATES OF CIDER: VIRGINIA

Trained&PrunedAppleTree

50 STATES OF CIDER: Ciderland USA: VIRGINIA

Includes Makers of Cider, Perry, Fruit Wines, Meads, and Ice Ciders.

Last updated November 24, 2013.

Have an addition, correction or found a broken link?  Leave a comment or send us an email.

VIRGINIA CIDER MAKERS (8):

Cider Makers of Virginia:

A

Albemarle Ciderworks North Garden, VA

B

Blue Bee Cider  Richmond, VA

Bold Rock Cider Nellysford, VA

C

Castle Hill Cider  Free Union, VA

F

Foggy Ridge Cider Dugspur, VA

O

Old Hill Cider  Timberville, VA

P

Potter’s Craft Cider Free Union, VA

W

Winchester Ciderworks Winchester, VA

EVENTS:

Cider Week Virginia  November 15 – 24, 2013

Link: ciderweekva.com

Please visit the individual cider makers websites to see what events they have scheduled throughout the year.

RESOURCES:

Websites:

Vintage Virginia Apples

Urban Homestead

Virginia Tech Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station Virginia Tech – click this LINK to explore various cider and apple related materials including downloadable pdfs.

Virginia Cooperative Extension 

Books: 

Apples of North America: 192 Exceptional Varieties for Gardeners, Growers, and Cooks by Tom Burford, Timber Press 2013.

Old Southern Apples. A Comprehensive History and Description of Varieties for Collectors, Growers, and Fruit Enthusiasts by Creighton Lee Calhoun, Jr., Chelsea Green 2011.

VIRGINIA APPLE & CIDER FACTS:

Virginia apple country includes the mountainous region of the northern Shenandoah Valley through the Roanoke Valley, the rich countryside of Albemarle and Rappahannock counties and the southwest counties of Patrick and Carroll. The majority of apples trees are grown in the Shenandoah Valley. 1

Virginia is the number 6 state in commercial apple production. 2

Famed Virginia apples included the Ablemarle Pippin (also known as the Yellow Newton or Newtown Pippin) and the Virginia or Hewe’s Crab. 3,4

Sources:

1 Virginia Apple Growers www.virginiaapples.org

2 U.S. Apple Association www.usapple.org

3 Apples of North America: 192 Exceptional Varieties for Gardeners, Growers, and Cooks by Tom Burford, Timber Press 2013.

4 Old Southern Apples. A Comprehensive History and Description of Varieties for Collectors, Growers, and Fruit Enthusiasts by Creighton Lee Calhoun, Jr., Chelsea Green 2011.

Visit CiderGuide.com to view current US Cider Map and to see if Virginia has any new cider makers.

Please leave a comment if you have VIRGINIA cider resources to add.

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The State of Cider: New York and Virginia. As One Cider Week Concludes, Another Commences.

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Cider Week New York. With this years numerous pre and post events, Cider Week NY has become an extended cider-filled celebration, exuberantly launching New Amsterdam, and environs, into the colder seasons of pome fruit drinking enjoyment.

As New York cider festivities  – though not New York’s cider enthusiasm – wind down, Virginia prepares for Cider Week Virginia.  American wine has a long history in Virginia, as does American cider. Virginia’s cidermakers have done much to restore our favorite fermented apple elixirs place at the table, and Cider Week Virginia celebrates the regions cider heritage and revival.

Our September Cider Road Trip to Virginia was chock full o’ cider. Upcoming posts will feature highlights of our Blue Ridge & Balto. cider adventures, and details of favorite Cider Week NY activities.

Save The Date for the final Cider Week New York event, November 24th, 2013. The New Amsterdam Market, in collaboration with Glynwood, will host The Third Annual New York State Cider Revival at The New York State Cider & Thanksgiving Market. Visit  newamsterdammarket.com for more details.

Links:

Cider Week Virginia ciderweekva.com November 15-24, 2013.

New Amsterdam Market newamsterdammarket.com November 24th, 2013.

Cider Week New York ciderweekny.com

Glynwood glynwood.org

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Resources: Your Daily Cider @HelloCider!

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Your Daily Cider: Tweeting Cider News from around the world, with a focus on Cider in the USA (and North America).

With @HelloCider we attempt to cover all things Cider: Cidermakers Profiles, Emerging Makers, Cider Debuts, Orcharding, Pollinators, Cider (Pome) Fruit Stories, Cider Business & Legislation, Cider Events, Cider History & Lore, Cider-Serving Establishments, Cider Reviews & Tasting Notes, Cider Recipes & Pairing, Cider Mixology, Cider Organizations, Heroes of Cider and Cider Readings & Resources. Everything Useful, Pertinent or Of Interest Re: Cider.

Find us @HelloCider

Tweeting Daily Cider Since December 2013.

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The State of Cider: Virginia. The Ciders of Virginia Prepare to Celebrate Cider Week Virginia.

Orchard at Vintage Virginia Apples

Cider Makers of Virginia:

Albemarle Ciderworks North Garden

Blue Bee Cider  Richmond

Bold Rock Cider Nellysford

Castle Hill Cider  Free Union

Foggy Ridge Cider Dugspur

Old Hill Cider  Timberville

Potter’s Craft Cider Free Union

Winchester Ciderworks Winchester

Cider Week Virginia November 15 -24, 2013

There will be tastings, pairings, home cider making workshops, cider cocktail competitions, an East vs West Cider Smackdown and that’s not all. Check the Cider Week Virginia website for all the details and get ready to Celebrate Cider Week Virginia!

Link: ciderweekva.com

Events: http://ciderweekva.com/events/

Image: Fall Orchard View at Ablemarle CiderWorks & Vintage Virginia Apples

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The State of Cider: Massachusetts Prepares to Celebrate CiderDays.

 

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19th Annual Franklin County CiderDays will be held this weekend, November 2-3, 2013.

CiderDays is one of the premier events of the North American Cider Season.

From the website:

“CiderDays is a community event celebrating all things apples in Franklin County, Massachusetts. 2013 marks the 19th year of this event and there will be two days (November 2nd and 3rd) of orchard tours, cidermaking and tastings, workshops and much more. This is for all who love apples, fresh or hard cider, apple cuisine, apple orchards or just being in New England in the fall.”

Franklin County CiderDays November 2 – 3, 2013

Two days celebrating and enjoying The Apple.

A few of the 2013 Event Highlights that caught our eye:

• Second Annual Cider Days Harvest Party 2013 Friday, Nov 1st – A kickoff event to benefit  CiderDays & includes the début of West County Ciders releases for 2013.

The Cider Salon — “the world’s largest hard cider tasting with more than 60 individual  cider brands from across North America”. 

CiderDay Locavore Harvest Supper 

Spanish Cider Tasting and Discussion with James Asbel of Ciders of Spain

North vs. South Heritage Apple Smackdown, Part Deux, a tasting and discussion with   Tom Burford and John Bunker.

Michael Phillips talks about Apple Varieties for the Organic Orchard

• Finding a Great Cider Apple in Your Backyard with John Bunker and Claude Jolicoeur

Apples for Juice and Cider with Claude Jolicoeur and Alan Suprenant

Organic Orcharding Practices: A Primer with Jennifer Williams and Steve Gougeon

• So You Want to Be a Commercial Cidermaker with Steve Gougeon and Andy Brennan

• Cidermaking 101 Workshop with Bob Delisle and Charlie Olchowski

Visit Franklin County CiderDays website for ALL the details and a complete list of events.

Link: www.ciderdays.org

Note: A bit about CiderDays from the website:

“CiderDay began in 1994 when Terry and Judith Maloney organized a small event to celebrate their harvest. Now called CiderDays and sponsored by the Franklin County Chamber of Commerce, it is a two-day event which celebrates its 19th year in 2013. The event is always held on the first weekend of November, when even the late-bearing cider apples have been picked.”

 

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Gleanings: On Apples, Terroir, and Newark Cider.

Trained&PrunedAppleTreeNewark Cider .

Gleanings: On Apples, Terroir, and Newark Cider.

Concerning Newark’s famous old time cider the following specific information on the ingredients thereof will be new and of interest to many readers. Our informant was the late John Oakes of Bloomfield. He said some time ago:

“Quite a large portion of the land in Bloomfield in the last century, the eighteenth and the first third of this the nineteenth, was in farms. They were small, comparatively few of more than fifty acres. The farmers raised on the land rye, oats, Indian corn, potatoes, and buckwheat; very little wheat and hay. They had large orchards of apples for making cider which under the name of ‘Newark cider’ was known over a large extent of country, shipped to the South, as well as to points in these parts. It was celebrated as the best. It was made the best from two kinds of apples mixed, two-thirds being Harrison apples, which were small and a light yellow color, a little tart and very juicy; and one third being the Canfield apple, large, red and sweet, both seedlings having originated here.”

Thus Newark cider was the product of Newark fruit and Newark invention. -JFF

Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, Volume 3 . New Jersey Historical Society, 1918 – New Jersey.

Trained&PrunedAppleTree

And this from: History of Essex and Hudson Counties, New Jersey, Volume 1. Everts & Peck, 1884 – Essex County (N.J.)
“The apple was planted extensively soon after the settlement, on a wide range of the cleared land.  As early as 1682, Governor Carteret, writing to the proprietors in England said
“At Newark is made great quantities of cider, exceeding any that we have from New England, Rhode Island or Long Island”.
The high quality of Newark cider has been maintained from then until now.
The red clay soil, the debris of the red sandstone, has been congenial to the growth and fine quality of the apple and pear; in fact there is no part of the State of New Jersey where fruit is superior to that grown in the county of Essex, and where the soil has been properly tilled and fertilized, agricultural products have always met the expectations of the cultivator.”
Trained&PrunedAppleTree

And from: The Western Agriculturist, and Practical Farmer’s Guide. Robinson and Fairbank, 1830. Nicholas Longworth Esq. – of the famed Catawaba wines of Ohio, a man considered the father of American grape culture – writes that the Harrison, Campfield, and Graniwinkle

“are the apples from which the celebrated Newark cider is made.”

Longworth experimented growing Harrison and Virginia crab apples in Ohio for cider, but he failed to achieve a wholly successful result, and details his effort thus:

“I obtained from Newark, New Jersey, many years since, some trees of the Harrison apple from which their celebrated cider is made. The cider I made from them was aqueous and seldom retains its sweetness till the proper season for bottling.

The best Newark cider is made on the Newark mountains on a poor stony soil.

On a recent visit to that state I particularly examined this apple in their orchards to endeavour to ascertain the difference. I found the apples knotty, and of a less size than the same fruit in the West, unfit for the table but evidently possessing more of the saccharine principle. The Virginia crab retains all its fine cider qualities with us in great perfection. No soil, no climate. no cultivation can make it edible. To reconcile these apparent contradictions writers have furnished us with no clue and we must endeavour to deduce them from analogy and reason.”

Trained&PrunedAppleTree

Proceedings Of The Farmers Club

APPLE GRAFTS

Mr Daniel B. Bruen, Newark, N. J. now brought forward a of cions of the apple, and read in connection therewith a report, of which the following is the substance:

This is the Harrison apple; its origin is in Orange, Essex county, N. J. and named after Simeon Harrison, owner of the farm. It is the most celebrated cider known. It bears large crops, fruit small. Eight bushels produce one barrel of cider; it is very rich in saccharine matter. This, the Campfield apple, has its origin in Newark, named after Matthew Campfield, one of the first settlers of Newark, almost universally used in the proportion of one-third with the Harrison in manufacturing the celebrated Newark cider. The fruit is rich in saccharine matter, and keeps well until spring; good for cooking, very little better for table use than a well-soaked cork from cider bottle.

Annual Report of the American Institute, of the City of New York. American Institute of the City of New York, 1869.

Resources: 
Search books.google.com and archive.org for more interesting cider and pomological information.
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Observations on Cider. No. 265. 1867.

cropped-observations.jpg

No. 265.

Observations on Cider.

From the great diversity of soil and climate in the United States of America, and the almost endless variety of its apples, it follows that much diversity of taste and flavour will necessarily be found in the cider that is made from them. To make good cider, the following general, but important, rules should be attended to. They demand a little more trouble than the ordinary mode of collecting and mashing apples of all sorts, rotten and sound, sweet and sour, dirty and clean, from the tree and the soil, and the rest of the slovenly process usually employed ; but in return they produce you a wholesome, high-flavoured, sound, and palatable liquor, that always commands an adequate price, instead of a solution of “villanous compounds,” in a poisonous and acid wash, that no man in his senses will drink. The finest cider was made of an equal portion of ripe, sound pippin and crab apples, pared, cored, and pressed, etc., with the utmost nicety. It was equal in flavour to any champagne that ever was made.

Title: Six hundred receipts, worth their weight in gold : including receipts for cooking, making preserves, perfumery, cordials, ice creams, inks, paints, dyes of all kinds, cider, vinegar, wines, spirits, whiskey, brandy, gin, etc., and how to make imitations of all kinds of liquors : together with valuable gauging tables : the collections, testing, and improvements on the receipts extending over a period of thirty years.

Author: Marquart, John  1867

Publisher: Philadelphia : J.E. Potter

via internetarchive.org

Read online: https://archive.org/details/sixhundredreceipt00marq

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If You Like Cider, Like We Like Cider

LOC apple imageA Quick Reminder (as if you need to be prodded to go out and seek cider):

Cider events abound this time of year – so if you like cider, like we like cider,

partake of the cider activities occurring across the country. And take a friend.

A Sampling:

Cider Week NY & Hudson Valley is well underway and the New Amsterdam region is awash in cider.

Cider Week NY  – New York & Hudson Valley – October 18 – 27, 2013

Link: http://ciderweekny.com/

Great Maine Apple Day an apple-filled day of talks, walks and apple ID sessions with  John Bunker and book signings with Claude Jolicoeur.

Great Maine Apple Day October 27, 2013

Link: http://mofga.org/Default.aspx?tabid=294

Franklin County Cider Days is in its 19th year as a “community event celebrating all things apple.” Offerings include workshops, tastings, cider salons, and more.

Franklin County Cider Days – Franklin County, Massachusetts Nov 2-3, 2013

Link: http://www.ciderdays.org

Cider Week VA – Virginia – November 15 – 23, 2013

Virginia is Cider County. We enjoyed Virginia cider and hospitality on a recent visit, and you can too.

Link: www.ciderweekva.com

Slow Food Russian River Event: Cider & Cheese Pairing with Titled Shed Ciderworks and Devoto Orchards Cider. Oct 27, 3-6 PM for tickets:

http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/470210

RESOURCES: To find cider festivities in your area:

Visit the website, pages, and twitter feeds of your favorite local & regional cider makers to find out what events they are involved in.

Check your regional cider association, alliance, or organization’s events list.

Great Lakes Cider & Perry Association 

Hudson Valley Cider Alliance 

Northwest Cider Association

Rocky Mountain Cider Association 

Vermont Ice Cider Association 

And in Canada:

Cidre du Québec / Les Cidriculteurs Artisans du Québec 

Ontario Craft Cider Association

Perhaps it is time for a National Cider Calendar?

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Cider + Cheese and You. A Tasting with Tilted Shed Ciderworks and DeVoto Orchards Cider.

A Slow Food Russian River Cider + Cheese Tasting Scholarship Fund Benefit Event

When our resident Cheesemonger crafted a fantasy-cheese pairing featuring Tilted Shed Ciderworks 2012 GRAVIVA! Semidry Cider, our cider pen pals at Tilted Shed responded by hosting the First-Ever Sebastopol Cider and Cheese Challenge and invited Apple Sauced Cider to join in. You can read about their cider+cheese pairing adventures here.

Actual Cider + Cheese Pairings are definitely more fun.

Want to enjoy a guided cheese + cider pairing featuring Tilted Shed Ciderworks & Devoto Orchards Cider? You Can!

Sign up for the upcoming SLOW FOOD RUSSIAN RIVER Benefit Event.

Link: EVENT: CIDER & CHEESE PAIRING OCT. 27, 3-6PM, SEBASTOPOL

“Devoto Orchards and Tilted Shed Ciderworks, two Sebastopol-area farm-based cider producers, will join six local cheesemakers in showcasing craft cider’s amazing range and versatility.”

Yes. The cider artisans and orchardists behind Apple Sauced Cider and Devoto Gardens are launching a new brand,: Devoto Orchards Cider. This first seasons releases of farmstead ciders will include: Gravenstein, 1976, and Cidre Noir.

251271

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REMATCH: Cider + Cheese. A Tasting with Tilted Shed Ciderworks and Apple Sauced Cider.

REMATCH: Cider + Cheese Pairing  

A while back we posted A Cheesemonger’s Challenge: Cider and Cheese Pairing with Tilted Shed Ciderworks 2012 GRAVIVA! Semidry Cider, conceived by our resident cheesemonger, and originally published at: Consider The Rind.

Graviva! label5-13X

The Idea: Select an interesting cider we have yet to try, and relying on the cider maker’s tasting notes, attempt to create a successful (at least on paper) cheese pairing.

Tilted Shed Ciderworks 2012 GRAVIVA! Semidry Cider from Ellen Cavalli and Scott Heath of Tilted Shed Ciderworks in the Russian River Valley, Sonoma County, California, was our cider pick. (You can read the original post here).

In reply to our challenge, the folks at Tilted Shed Ciderworks paired with Jolie Devoto-Wade and Hunter Wade of Apple Sauced Cider, and taking cues from our suggested cheese selection, created their own taste-off adding Apple Sauce Cider’s Save The Gravenstein to the mix.

APPLE SAUCED LOGO

Expanding on the original, the Sebastopol cider makers cheese selection included several local artisanal cheeses – guided by the pair local ‘what grows together goes together’ principle. 

Visit the Tilted Shed Ciderworks blog to read the full post: First-ever Sebastopol Cider and Cheese Challenge and learn the results of their actual cheese challenge tasting.

Save A Heritage Apple. Drink a Gravenstein Paired with Local Cheese.

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Saving Apples by Making Cider. Drink a Gravenstein Today.

Gravenstein

Pomme Fruit: Gravenstein Apples In The Russian River Valley, Sonoma County, California.

The Sebastopol Gravenstein, a vividly colored, aromatic, flavorful heirloom apple is historically important in the Russian River Valley. So dominant in the region, the ribbon of roadway running through the acres of orchards became known as The Gravenstein Highway – honoring the apples prolific presence. Declining prices for processing apples, the increasing popularity of other more ‘commercially viable’ apples, and a booming West Coast wine industry, all led to Gravenstein orchards being ripped out to make way for the extremely lucrative wine grapes that now populate the region.

David Karp, writing for the LA Times:

“Gravenstein is still a favorite in northern Europe and is cultivated from Nova Scotia to the Pacific Northwest, but it reaches its greatest perfection in the Sebastopol district of western Sonoma County, at the border of the maritime and inland climatic zones, where the morning fog gives way to a moderately hot afternoon sun. The area’s fine, sandy loam soil is well suited to apples. The huge trees, grafted on seedling rootstock, develop roots deep enough to survive the dry summers without irrigation.”

Concerned Sonoma County cider makers are working to revive interest in this heirloom apple by focusing on the Gravenstein’s many desirable cider worthy traits, crafting ‘Gravs’ into unique ciders that celebrate and express the heritage of the apple and the region.

Saving Apples by Making Cider. Drink a Gravenstein Today.

Find A Gravenstein Cider:

Tilted Shed Ciderworks: Graviva! Semi Dry Cider

Apple Sauced Cider: Save The Gravenstein! Cider

Devoto Orchards Cider: Gravenstein first release October 14, 2013

Gleanings (sources for further reading):

LATimes: The future of Gravenstein apples hangs on a thin stem by David Karp

NPR: Gravenstein Apples: The End Of Summer In A Fruit by Nicole SpIridakis

Zester Daily: The Fight To Save Sonoma’s Gravenstein Apple by Tina Caputo

Slow Food USA Ark of Taste: Sebastopol Gravenstein

Slow Food USA Sebastopol Gravenstein Apple Presidia

Gravenstein apple image (detail) – credit: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”

Link: The future of Gravenstein apples hangs on a thin stem. July 12, 2013 By David Karp. Special to the Los Angeles Times

 

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Pomme Fruit: The Harrison Apple. 2 Views: circa 1817 and 1899.

Circa 1817 image (left)  from the unpublished atlas of Wm. Coxe. Illustration executed by one of Mr. Coxe’s daughters, possibly Elizabeth (Coxe) McMurtrie.

Image Credit: Special Collections, National Agricultural Library.

1899 image (right) painted by Deborah Griscom Passmore, an illustrator for the USDA.

Image credit : “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705″

http://usdawatercolors.nal.usda.gov/

 

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“Water colors with wonderful fidelity to nature and with such delicacy of touch and such genuine artistic sense of color”

According to a letter to the Editor (extract presented below) of The Country Gentleman, from Mr. E. L. R. of Baltimore, Md:

Mr William Coxe was for several years a member of Congress from New Jersey but such was his fondness for pomology that notwithstanding the many demands upon his time in consequence of his political and other pursuits he still found leisure to collect materials for an enlarged and elegant edition of his work on Fruit Trees.

This unfortunately, he did not live to bring to perfection. It had been his intention that the second edition should have contained beautiful colored engravings to accompany the descriptions of each of the fruits mentioned in his book. For this purpose his daughter, Mrs McMurtrie still living in Philadelphia, and her accomplished sisters had prepared numerous accurate drawings of life size upon Bristol board of the fruits to be represented and then painted them in water colors with wonderful fidelity to nature and with such delicacy of touch and such genuine artistic sense of color that it is greatly to be regretted that these evidences of early American art have not seen the light in the form originally intended.

source: The Country Gentleman, Volume 9 via Google eBook

L. Tucker, 1857

A journal for the farm, the garden, and the fireside, devoted to improvement in agriculture, horticulture, and rural taste; to elevation in mental, moral, and social character, and the spread of useful knowledge and current news.
x
A bit about William Coxe:
William Coxe wrote the first book on American pomology, A View of the Cultivation of Fruit Trees, and the Management of Orchards and Cider published in 1817. This seminal work can be read online via google books and archive.org.
The watercolor pomological illustrations presented here are from an unpublished atlas of apples that is in manuscripts collection of USDA National Agricultural Library.

Collection Number: 44 Collection Name: Coxe, William, Manuscript

William Coxe also had a “national reputation for his cider, at an age when it was a famous and characteristic beverage this according to Proceedings of the State Horticultural Society at Its Annual Session, Volume 42 , New Jersey State Horticultural Society, 1917.
For all additional information on William Coxe published on this blog, look here.

 

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Cider Review: Farnum Hill Cider DOORYARD STILL CIDER Batch 1214: Cider52

Trained&PrunedAppleTree

Cider: FARNUM HILL CIDER DOORYARD STILL CIDER BATCH 1214 

Maker: Farnum Hill Cider & Poverty Lane Orchards   Origin:  Lebanon, New Hampshire

website: www.povertylaneorchards.com

ABV: 7.5%  Bottle: 750 ml, wine cork

Style Notes:  The Dooryard series are cider batches that departed from the flavor profiles of established Farnum Hill blends. Each keg or bottle of Dooryard Cider is marked with a batch number, allowing you to look up the details of your specific cider, giving you a glimpse into the cider making process at Farnum Hill.

Fruit: Apples. Golden Russet is a featured apple in this blend.

Cider Maker: Nicole LeGrand Leibon.

Makers Notes: Dooryard No. 1214 – Still, in Bottles:

Our first Still (no bubbles) Dooryard in a while, this opens with citrus and sweet florals. We used a high proportion of Golden Russet in this, and its fruity sweetness and full body comes through in the mouth, with pink grapefruit, sour cherry and quinine. The finish is long and fruity, with citrus and their peels carrying. (NL)

FH Dooryard Still

Our Tasting Notes:  

Farnum Hill Dooryard 1214 Still Cider pours a bright and shining rich roman gold, with gigantic bubbles that immediately fall dead still.

Slight smokey notes of tobacco leaf, whiskey, and oak meld with citrus peel, baked apple, roast honey, chalk and green pepper. A quick swirl offers up toasted hazelnuts, and a hint of pineapple.

The first taste is smooth, silky, pleasingly bitter, lightly tannic, a bit salty, with subterranean lingering apple tones.

Deliciously complex aromas confounded at first. On reading the cider makers tasting notes, the quinine with pink grapefruit peel became more clearly identifiable.

The floral aromas were more green than sweet reminiscent of lilies and tulips, herbaceous and slightly pungent.

Reading the cider maker’s tasting notes can be very helpful. Accurate, well written information from the cider maker can increase your cider knowledge, and enhance the cider drinking experience.

Overall Impressions: Extremely intriguing smokey and green floral aromas. Vinous and crisp, with refreshingly bitter flavors of quinine and grapefruit. An aromatic, complex and challenging cider. If you enjoy a brisk Gin & Tonic, and white wines with sharp minerality, this is a cider for you.

Taster’s Side Note: The fact that this is a very Golden Russet heavy cider, makes us want to explore other ciders that feature this apple.

Dooryard 1214 was featured as one of the The Ciders Of Summer. Our Favorite American Craft Ciders For Drinking Right Now, perfect for summer, but certainly a cider we would drink in these cooler months, if we could find a bottle.

 

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Other Pome Fruits: Pears and Quince Considered

bosc6_med

Other Pome Fruits: Pears and Quince Considered.

American cider makers are exploring cider beyond the apple. Pears, and even Quince, can be crafted into quite fine ciders. Along with our ongoing apple based cider research, upcoming posts will consider these other pome fruits, and the unique ciders, perrys and poires their artful fermentation produces.

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Pyrus communis: : Bon Chretien de Vernois Pear

POM00006904.BonChretienPear

Pyrus communis: : Bon Chretien de Vernois Pear

Artist:
Steadman, Royal Charles, b. 1875
Scientific name:
Pyrus communis
Common name:
pears
Variety:
Bon Chretien de Vernois
Geographic origin:
Saint Petersburg, Pinellas County, Florida, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 17 x 25 cm.
Specimen:
95913
Year:
1918
Notes on original:
Martin Compas
Date created:
1918-09-27
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
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Cydonia oblonga: Champion Quince

POM00001122ChampionQuinceGEXS

Cydonia oblonga: Champion

Artist:
Steadman, Royal Charles, b. 1875
Scientific name:
Cydonia oblonga
Common name:
quinces
Variety:
Champion
Geographic origin:
Geneva, Ontario County, New York, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 17 x 25 cm.
Specimen:
94081
Year:
1918
Notes on original:
Geneva Experiment Station
Date created:
1918-01-09
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
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Cider52 Goal: A Cider Review A Week or 52 American Ciders in 2013

VA RT Treasures

Cider52: A Cider Review A Week The original plan: 52 weeks, 52 cider tastings, pairings and postings. As of May 3, 2013  we revised our goal, now it’s 52 American Made Ciders to be reviewed in 2013. We’ll continue to explore and review World Cider, but the 52 Ciders in 2013 goal is now CIDER USA.

With barely 13 weeks left in 2013 – we better get busy if we intended to meet our goal. So expect more cider reviews in these last few months of 2013 The Year of Cider.

US CIDERS REVIEWED SO FAR:

The list of American Ciders reviewed with links to the reviews:

January 2013

Original Sin Hard Cider Newtown Pippin

February 2013

Harvest Moon Cidery Four Screw Hard Cider with Maple Syrup

Pomona cider/braggot on cask, house brewed at Birreria, Eataly NY

March 2013

Slyboro Cider House Hidden Star

Slyboro Cider House Old Sin

April 2013

West Country Cider Redfield 

Harvest Moon Cidery Heritage Hops Hard Cider with Hops

Breezy Hill Orchard Hudson Valley Farmhouse Cider

West County Reine de Pomme 

Cider In Context: Breezy Hill Orchard Farmhouse Cider, Slyboro Cider Old Sin, Farnum Hill Extra Dry Cider

May 2013

Crispin THE SAINT

Crispin BARE NAKED 

Farnum Hill DOORYARD Batch 1202A 

Breezy HIll Orchard Barrel Tasting (6) ciders and barrel samples 

ANTHEM Organic Traditionally Fermented Cider 

June 2013

Aaron Burr Cider BOURBON BARREL CIDER Sparkling

Farnum Hill DOORYARD Batch 1206Tasting Journal

July 2013

Wandering  Aengus Ciderworks WANDERLUST 

August 2013

The Ciders of Summer. Our Favorite American Craft Ciders for Drinking Right Now:

September 2013

Farnum Hill FARMHOUSE CIDER

October 2013

Farnum Hill Cider DOORYARD STILL CIDER Batch 1214 pending

Eve’s Cider BECKHORN HOLLOW DRY CIDER pending

For a list of ALL ciders reviewed so far (Including ciders from around the world), see the CIDER REVIEWS: CIDER52 page.

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What We’re Reading: Scott Laboratories 2013 -2014 Cider Handbook.

Scott 2013-14

What We’re Reading: The 2013 -2014 Cider Handbook from Scott Laboratories.

September 7, 2013 Scott Laboratories announced its first ever Cider Handbook.

Known for an annual fermentation handbook, with information and resources geared to the needs of wineries, breweries, and distilleries in North America, the people at Scott Labs felt it was time to create a handbook focused on cider:

“The 60-page Handbook contains products, articles, and protocols specific to the cider industry. With cider sales in the U.S. tripling since 2007, Scott recognized that this growing market needed attention.”

The 2013-2014 Cider Handbook, is available in the U.S. and Canada. To request a free copy email info@scottlab.com. Or visit www.scottlab.com.

The end papers of the handbook features images courtesy of Albemarle CiderWorks, depicting 32 apple varieties including Golden Pearmain, Razor Russet, Black Twig, Crow Egg, and Redfield.

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Cider Mapping: NEW United States Cider Map with A-Z List by State at Cider Guide

Cider Mapping: See the NEW Map of United States Cider with A-Z List by State at Eric West’s Cider Guide.

A click on the map (below) will take you directly to Cider Guide.

Cider Guide US Map

(Our view of the map is current as of 10-4-2013. Go to www.ciderguide.com for the latest information).

When you want to know whose making cider, state by state in the US of A – check Eric West’s new map and list at ciderguide.com.

Cider Guide’s US CIDER map & list are helpfully color coded by category, and the list is organized by state. The information includes current  & announced cider producers, and producers of perry, ice cider, fruit wine, mead, and apple & pear spirits. Bottle shops that feature cider, and cider bars & restaurants are also noted.

Cider Guide’s current Stats for Cider in the US are:

 Cider Producers – 199
 Perry Producers – 19
 Ice Cider Producers – 17
 Fruit Wine (Apple/Pear) Producers – 46
 Mead (Apple/Pear) Producers – 26
 Spirits (Apple/Pear) Producers – 20
 Cider Bars/Pubs/Restaurants – 11
 Cider Bottle Shops – 14
 Cider Producers In-Planning – 27

Visit Cider Guide for a full view of the new US CIDER MAP and take a look at the cider maps for the rest of the world as well.

If you have notes or additions, please visit Cider Guide and leave a comment www.ciderguide.com.

 

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Aaron Burr Bourbon Barrel Cider – If You Find It, Drink It.

LOC apple image

Aaron Burr Bourbon Barrel Cider is only available at a handful of select establishments in the North East, and in very limited quantities.

A few sources we might suggest:

Jimmy’s No. 43 NYC

The Queen’s Kickshaw Astoria, Queens, NY

Eleven Madison Park  NYC

If You Find It – Drink It. We sincerely believe you will not be disappointed. You won’t have the opportunity to drink this cider again for at least 14 months.

Andy Brennan ages his small batch micro-crafted cider in bourbon barrels for 2 years – and there won’t be another release until very late in 2014 .

Here is a link to our tasting notes for Aaron Burr Bourbon Barrel Cider Sparkling.

If you want to explore the world of Aaron Burr Cider click here

And do read and enjoy Aaron Burr Cider’s Cider 101: True Cider in America

Cider Week NY Event: Talking About History: The History of Cider-making in New York with Andy Brennan of Aaron Burr Cider, Oct 13, 3-4 PM. RSVP required: programs@kingmanor.org.

The King Manor Museum
150-03 Jamaica Ave. (150th and 153rd Streets
Queens, NY 11432
For more 2013 Cider Week NY Events check the website www.ciderweekny.com
And for a full list of Aaron Burr Cider stockists check the link locations-find us
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(Early) American Cider Apples From DANIEL SMITH and CO. Nursery, Burlington, New Jersey 18o4

Agricultural.

Extract.

From The Trenton Federalist.
1803
One of the best opportunities for improving their plantations with choice fruit is now offered to the farmers in this part country, by the opening of the extensive nursery of Daniel Smith & Co. of Burlington, for the sale of trees. This nursery has been many years in  forming is certainly one of the grandest collections of choice trees in the United States. No expense nor pains have been spared to make the collection complete, and the taking bids fair to produce the greatest benefits to the agricultural interests of West Jersey. 1
danielsmithfruittreecatalogue1804-s

Below is a list of (early) American Cider Apples from DANIEL SMITH & CO. of Burlington, New Jersey, circulated as a broadsheet catalog for apple trees available in the fall of 18o4.

AMERICAN CIDER APPLES.
Note:
“The letter S. denotes the Trees of that kind being smaller than the others. C. denotes Cyder Fruit.”
  • APPLES.
  • 1 Large Newtown pippins
  • 2 Cooper’s russeting C.
  • 3 Michael-Henry
  • 4 Shippen’s russeting or Newark gate
  • 5 Summer queen
  • 6 White calville
  • 7 Reinette grise
  • 8 Sweet and sour
  • 9 Hunt’s green Newtown pippin
  • 11 Newark or French yellow pippin
  • 12 Redling
  • 13 Stockton’s early
  • 15 Large red and green sweeting
  • 16 Large early harvest
  • 17 Monstrous pippin
  • 18 Large piplin
  • 19 Golden pippin
  • 20 Everlasting apple
  • 21 Lady apple or Pomme d’Apis
  • 22 Doctor apple
  • 23 English codling
  • 24 Swett’s harvest
  • 25 Early junating
  • 26 Belle fleur
  • 27 Orange apple
  • 28 Black apple
  • 29 Hewes’s crab C.
  • 30 Wine sop
  • 31 Early bough apple
  • 32 Harrison apple C.
  • 33 Maiden’s blush
  • 34 Fall pippin
  • 35 Campfield’s apple C.
  • 36 Morgan’s apple
  • 37 Little early reinette
  • 38 White’s early pearmain
  • 39 Wine apple
  • 43 Rhode-Island greening
  • 44 Roman stem
  • 45 Pennock’s red winter
  • 46 Brown’s winter
  • 47 Gilpin or carthouse
  • 48 American pippin
  • 49 Catline
  • 50 Rambour
  • 51 Winter queen
  • 52 Hays’s winter
  • 53 Lady finger S.
  • 55 Ruckman’s pearmain S.
  • 56 Flushing Spitzbergen
  • 57 Newtown do. S.
  • 58 Aesopus do.
  • 59 Jersey greening
  • 60 American nonpareil
  • 61 Quince apple
  • 62 Burlington late pearmain
  • 65 Priestly
  • 67 Greyhouse or romanite
  • 71 Grub’s summer
  • 76 Granny Winkle C.
  • 83 Burlington greening
  • 84 Red Calville
  • 85 Newark sweeting.
A catalogue of the fruit trees, &c. in the nursery of Daniel Smith and Co. Burlington, New Jersey, for sale in the fall of 1804 …. [Burlington, 1804].
Source: Library of Congress, Rare Book and Special Collections Division.
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Heirloom Apples. New Amsterdam Market.

3 Apples Grav, Pitmaston, H.Nonesuch

New Amsterdam Market at the old Fulton Fish Market, on South Street and Peck Slip in Lower Manhattan, this Sunday, September 29th, featured regional cheese makers and dairy products. We could not resist these beautiful apples at the Flying Fox stall. Gravenstein, Pitmaston Pineapple, Hubbardston Nonesuch, diminutive Dolgo Crab, the charmingly named Famuese, to mention only a few, each more lovely than the next.

Grav, Pitmaston & Hubardston NAM

Support your local growers and farmers markets, and encourage fruit diversity by ‘eating it to save it’. Enjoy the seasons beautiful heritage pome fruits.

Dolgo-close

New Amsterdam Market www.newamsterdammarket.org:

“Since 2006, New Amsterdam Market has advocated for the preservation and rehabilitation of the Old Fulton Fish Market, a public-owned site of immense value for both cultural and economic development.”

Read more about the vision for the Seaport and the Market District here.

Flying Fox, fruit hand-picked and selected by fruiterer, Maggie Nescuir.

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Apple Belts of North America circa 1914.

LOC apple image

The Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture:

Apple belts.

In comparing the great apple growing regions of the continent it is convenient to designate each by its leading variety. In the eastern part of the continent, there is the Fameuse or Wealthy belt on the north, the Ben Davis belt on the south, and the Baldwin belt lying intermediate between these two. It is seen that varieties differ greatly as to their adaptability to different regions. The degree of soil aeration and of soil moisture and the range of atmospheric and soil temperatures are among the most important determining factors of the geographical range of commercial apple growing with any variety. Passing westward into the mid continental region it is found that the Baldwin belt does not extend west of Lake Michigan. The climatic extremes are here too severe for that variety and many of its eastern associates of a similar degree of hardiness.

In all that vast territory which extends westward from the Great Lakes these varieties disappear and do not again appear till the states of the Pacific Coast are reached. Instead the Wealthy belt extends southward till it reaches the region where Wealthy yields leadership to Ben Davis. In this connection it is worthy of note that from the Atlantic Coast westward to the Missouri River, the north margin of the Ben Davis belt approximately coincides with the southern boundary of the geological area covered by the Wisconsin drift.

Wealthy belt.

The mid-continental territory in which Wealthy is generally speaking the leading variety includes northern Illinois, the north half of Iowa, and practically all of the apple growing districts of Wisconsin, Minnesota, South Dakota, and northern Nebraska. Among the more important varieties associated with it are for the more northern parts Oldenburg, Okabenal, Patten (Patten Greening) and Malinda. Among the very hardiest of the large size apples for the North are those of the Hibernal group, but their fruit is so austere that it is esteemed of little value except for culinary uses. In the southern part of the Wealthy belt are grown hardy varieties of more or less local value such as Salome, Windsor, Black Annette and Colorado Orange varieties which as yet have not established themselves in the great world markets but which are valued where better varieties cannot be satisfactorily grown.

Ben Davis belt.

Generally speaking, Ben Davis is the leading variety in central and southern Illinois, the south half of Iowa, and the apple growing districts of Arkansas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Kansas and the south half of Nebraska. With its close kin the Gano, and the Black Ben Davis which evidently are highly colored bud sports of Ben Davis. it probably produces at least one half of the commercial apple crop in this region. Winesap and Jonathan appear to be next in order of importance with Winesap perhaps in the lead. Other important varieties are Grimes, Rome Beauty, Willow (Twig), Missouri (Pippin), Minkler and Ralls. York Imperial is gaining ground Stayman Winesap is one of the newer kinds which will be more largely planted. Delicious also is attracting attention particularly because of its agreeable dessert quality and good appearance. The Stayman and Delicious are being planted to some extent in the southern part of the Wealthy belt as Jonathan and Grimes have been.

Page 325.

From:

The Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture:

A Discussion for the Amateur, and the Professional and Commercial Grower, of the Kinds, Characteristics and Methods of Cultivation of the Species of Plants Grown in the Regions of the United States and Canada for Ornament, for Fancy, for Fruit and for Vegetables; with Keys to the Natural Families and Genera, Descriptions of the Horticultural Capabilities of the States and Provinces and Dependent Islands, and Sketches of Eminent Horticulturists, Volume 1

Edited by Liberty Hyde Bailey, Macmillan, 1914

Read or download a copy via google here.

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Malus domestica: Fameuse

POM00002208

Malus domestica: Fameuse

Artist:
Newton, Amanda Almira, ca. 1860-1943
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Variety:
Fameuse
Geographic origin:
Wisconsin, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 17 x 25 cm.
Specimen:
99996
Year:
1921
Notes on original:
Exhibited at A.P.S. Meeting, Columbus, OH, Dec. 1-4, 1920
Date created:
1921
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
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Malus domestica: Wealthy

POM00003669

Malus domestica: Wealthy

Artist:
Schutt, Ellen Isham, 1873-1955
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Variety:
Wealthy
Geographic origin:
Buffalo, Erie County, New York, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 17 x 25 cm.
NAL note:
Alternative variety name(s): Wealthy 251a, Wealthy 255b
Specimen:
33206; 33208
Year:
1904
Notes on original:
Negative Number 5342; 33206a – [Irog?] first picking. 33206b – 2 cultivation first picking
Date created:
1904
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
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Malus domestica: Baldwin

POM00001449

Malus domestica: Baldwin

Artist:
Arnold, Mary Daisy, ca. 1873-1955
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Variety:
Baldwin
Geographic origin:
New Bedford, Bristol County, Massachusetts, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 16 x 25 cm.
Specimen:
79743; 79759
Year:
1915
Date created:
1915-01-11
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
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Malus domestica: Ben Davis

POM00000163

Malus domestica: Ben Davis

Artist:
Newton, Amanda Almira, ca. 1860-1943
Scientific name:
Malus domestica
Common name:
apples
Variety:
Ben Davis
Geographic origin:
Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina, United States
Physical description:
1 art original : col. ; 17 x 25 cm.
Specimen:
55896
Year:
1912
Date created:
1912-03-29
Rights:
Use of the images in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection is not restricted, but a statement of attribution is required. Please use the following attribution statement: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”
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Cider Ireland. Then and Now: AppleFest. Slow Food Apple and Craft Cider Festival.

3b51100r(appleprint)

1911 Encyclopedia Britannica:

Cider used to be made in the south of Ireland, but the industry had almost become extinct until revived by the Department of Agriculture, which in 1904 erected a cider-making plant at Drogheda, Co. Louth, gave assistance to private firms at Dungarvan, Co. Waterford, and Fermoy, Co. Cork, and provided a traveling mill and press to work in the South Riding of Co. Tipperary. The results have been highly satisfactory, a large quantity of good cider having been produced.

Source: 1911 Encyclopedia Brittannica. The eleventh edition of the Encyclopedia Britannica, first published in 1911

Entry: Cider

Find an online version at archive.org

CIDER IRELAND 2013

From the Cider Ireland website:

Cider Ireland is a group of like-minded apple growers and cider makers from the island of Ireland.

As a group we can promise you that we are owner operators who only make cider from 100% Irish grown apples, that the cider we produce is made from the juice of pressed apples, never, ever from concentrate, and we don’t add colourants.

Read about Redefining Irish Cider

Slow Food Ireland Celebrating AppleFest 

21st – 22nd, September 2013

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