Category Archives: Cider Craft & Knowledge.

Windfalls: Found Apple Poems, A Selection.

4a21388vLOC 
 
– – –
 
Api Panache
 
 
(Panachee).
 
Yellowish green,
 
 
round-ish, small,
 
indifferent;
 
 
October to December ;
 
 
more curious than useful.
 
– – –
 
Bedfordshire Foundling
 
 
(Cambridge Pippin). –
 
Yellow, roundish, oblong, large, kitchen,
 
 
first-rate ;  
 
 
November to March ;
 
 
very handsome, large and ex-cellent.
 
 
Bennet.
 
 
Greenish red, ovate,
 
 
middle-sized,
 
 
cider ;
 
 
November to December ;
 
 
a bitter-sweet. 
 
 
 
 
 

The Gardener”s Monthly Volume.

The Apple

It’s Culture, Uses, and History

1847

by George William Johnson & R. Errington

via googlebooks

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Gleanings: On Apples, Terroir, and Newark Cider.

Trained&PrunedAppleTreeNewark Cider .

Gleanings: On Apples, Terroir, and Newark Cider.

Concerning Newark’s famous old time cider the following specific information on the ingredients thereof will be new and of interest to many readers. Our informant was the late John Oakes of Bloomfield. He said some time ago:

“Quite a large portion of the land in Bloomfield in the last century, the eighteenth and the first third of this the nineteenth, was in farms. They were small, comparatively few of more than fifty acres. The farmers raised on the land rye, oats, Indian corn, potatoes, and buckwheat; very little wheat and hay. They had large orchards of apples for making cider which under the name of ‘Newark cider’ was known over a large extent of country, shipped to the South, as well as to points in these parts. It was celebrated as the best. It was made the best from two kinds of apples mixed, two-thirds being Harrison apples, which were small and a light yellow color, a little tart and very juicy; and one third being the Canfield apple, large, red and sweet, both seedlings having originated here.”

Thus Newark cider was the product of Newark fruit and Newark invention. -JFF

Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, Volume 3 . New Jersey Historical Society, 1918 – New Jersey.

Trained&PrunedAppleTree

And this from: History of Essex and Hudson Counties, New Jersey, Volume 1. Everts & Peck, 1884 – Essex County (N.J.)
“The apple was planted extensively soon after the settlement, on a wide range of the cleared land.  As early as 1682, Governor Carteret, writing to the proprietors in England said
“At Newark is made great quantities of cider, exceeding any that we have from New England, Rhode Island or Long Island”.
The high quality of Newark cider has been maintained from then until now.
The red clay soil, the debris of the red sandstone, has been congenial to the growth and fine quality of the apple and pear; in fact there is no part of the State of New Jersey where fruit is superior to that grown in the county of Essex, and where the soil has been properly tilled and fertilized, agricultural products have always met the expectations of the cultivator.”
Trained&PrunedAppleTree

And from: The Western Agriculturist, and Practical Farmer’s Guide. Robinson and Fairbank, 1830. Nicholas Longworth Esq. – of the famed Catawaba wines of Ohio, a man considered the father of American grape culture – writes that the Harrison, Campfield, and Graniwinkle

“are the apples from which the celebrated Newark cider is made.”

Longworth experimented growing Harrison and Virginia crab apples in Ohio for cider, but he failed to achieve a wholly successful result, and details his effort thus:

“I obtained from Newark, New Jersey, many years since, some trees of the Harrison apple from which their celebrated cider is made. The cider I made from them was aqueous and seldom retains its sweetness till the proper season for bottling.

The best Newark cider is made on the Newark mountains on a poor stony soil.

On a recent visit to that state I particularly examined this apple in their orchards to endeavour to ascertain the difference. I found the apples knotty, and of a less size than the same fruit in the West, unfit for the table but evidently possessing more of the saccharine principle. The Virginia crab retains all its fine cider qualities with us in great perfection. No soil, no climate. no cultivation can make it edible. To reconcile these apparent contradictions writers have furnished us with no clue and we must endeavour to deduce them from analogy and reason.”

Trained&PrunedAppleTree

Proceedings Of The Farmers Club

APPLE GRAFTS

Mr Daniel B. Bruen, Newark, N. J. now brought forward a of cions of the apple, and read in connection therewith a report, of which the following is the substance:

This is the Harrison apple; its origin is in Orange, Essex county, N. J. and named after Simeon Harrison, owner of the farm. It is the most celebrated cider known. It bears large crops, fruit small. Eight bushels produce one barrel of cider; it is very rich in saccharine matter. This, the Campfield apple, has its origin in Newark, named after Matthew Campfield, one of the first settlers of Newark, almost universally used in the proportion of one-third with the Harrison in manufacturing the celebrated Newark cider. The fruit is rich in saccharine matter, and keeps well until spring; good for cooking, very little better for table use than a well-soaked cork from cider bottle.

Annual Report of the American Institute, of the City of New York. American Institute of the City of New York, 1869.

Resources: 
Search books.google.com and archive.org for more interesting cider and pomological information.
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Observations on Cider. No. 265. 1867.

cropped-observations.jpg

No. 265.

Observations on Cider.

From the great diversity of soil and climate in the United States of America, and the almost endless variety of its apples, it follows that much diversity of taste and flavour will necessarily be found in the cider that is made from them. To make good cider, the following general, but important, rules should be attended to. They demand a little more trouble than the ordinary mode of collecting and mashing apples of all sorts, rotten and sound, sweet and sour, dirty and clean, from the tree and the soil, and the rest of the slovenly process usually employed ; but in return they produce you a wholesome, high-flavoured, sound, and palatable liquor, that always commands an adequate price, instead of a solution of “villanous compounds,” in a poisonous and acid wash, that no man in his senses will drink. The finest cider was made of an equal portion of ripe, sound pippin and crab apples, pared, cored, and pressed, etc., with the utmost nicety. It was equal in flavour to any champagne that ever was made.

Title: Six hundred receipts, worth their weight in gold : including receipts for cooking, making preserves, perfumery, cordials, ice creams, inks, paints, dyes of all kinds, cider, vinegar, wines, spirits, whiskey, brandy, gin, etc., and how to make imitations of all kinds of liquors : together with valuable gauging tables : the collections, testing, and improvements on the receipts extending over a period of thirty years.

Author: Marquart, John  1867

Publisher: Philadelphia : J.E. Potter

via internetarchive.org

Read online: https://archive.org/details/sixhundredreceipt00marq

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Harvest, Crush & Press: WSU – Washington State University: Mount Vernon – Ciderland WSU

LOC apple image

Watch the WSU – Mount Vernon Research and Extension Unit’s way with apples.

See the Littau Raspberry Harvester in Action!

Enjoy the peppy cider making score.

Interested in cider making in the Northwest’s maritime fruit regions? Have a look at this handy booklet from WSU -Bulletin PNW 621 Hard Cider Production and Orchard Management in the Pacific Northwest (11/2010), available for hard copy purchase or digital download at a very reasonable price.

Want to know what kind of cider research is happening at WSU? Here’s a link.

Want to attend Cider School? You Can!

Visit Northwest Agricultural Business Center site, see All Things Cider for details.

Do you want to gain a thorough understanding of cider & perry and acquire the skills & knowledge necessary to make quality products?”

The course Principles & Practices  offered July 2013  – (2) sessions are already SOLD OUT.

Other seminars may still have space available:

BUSINESS OF MAKING HARD CIDER
June 22nd, 2013 – WSU/NWREC – 9:00am to 4:00pm

BUSINESS OF GROWING CIDER APPLES:
July 20th, 2013 – WSU/NWREC – 9:00am to 2:00pm

ADVANCED CIDER MAKING: (TBA)

Northwest Cider Seminar Dec. 15, 2012 Links: The Cider Market & Industry slides

See free pdf handbooks – incluidng:

New Alternative Fruit Crops for Western Washington

WSU – Mount Vernon, Washington, and Cornell  – Geneva, New York, have cider education offerings.

Not from the Northwest and want cider knowledge?

Visit your local land-grant institution’s extension program to see what’s on offer.

Glean the Knowledge!

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Cider Mapping the World: The World Map of Cider

Mapping world cider activity: The World Map of Cider

Created by Eric West, Certified Cicerone, BJCP judge, and the man behind Cider Guide, The world guide to cider, perry, and related drinks website. Look for the upcoming The Cider Guide To North America, slated for publication sometime in 2013.

The World Map of Cider is an ongoing effort and is updated regularly.

The map markers are divided into (9) categories:

Cidery  Winery  Brewery/Meadery
Ice Cidery  Distillery
Bar/Pub  Bottle Shop  Orchard/Museum/Other POI
Event/Festival

Last updated: January 31, 2013

To make additions to the map: Please send your feedback to map {AT} ciderguide {DOT} com!

TheWorldMapofCider

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Get The Facts: U.S. Apple Statistics Data Set 2012

assorted apples

U. S. Apple Statistics Data Set

Description:

Annual data on U.S. and State number of farms, acreage, yield, production, prices, crop value, trade, and per capita use of apples. Also includes monthly data on shipments, imports and exports, and world data on production.

Data-set released May 2012.

U. S. Apple Statistics Data Set

40 downloadable tables. Includes:

World apple production, including top-producing countries, 1980-2010

U.S. apple production and utilization, by State, 1980-2010

U.S. apples utilized for juice and cider: production and grower price, by State, 1980-2010

Apples, fresh: Monthly prices received by growers, United States, 1980 to date

State census of farms growing apples, 1982, 1987, 1992, 1997, and 2007

—————————————————————————————————–

Accessed online via  Cornell University Library Albert R. Mann Library

ERS Economic Research Service

USDA Economics, Statistics and Market Information System (ESMIS)

USDA United States Department of Agriculture

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Cider Mapping the United States & Canada: The North American Cider Map Project

Mapping North American cider activity: The North American Cider Map Project.

Created by David White, virtual orchard keep at the Oldtimecider.com website, current President of NWCA, The Northwest Cider Association, and co-owner of Whitewood Cider Co.”Handcrafted in Olympia, Washington” fame.

The North American Cider Map Project is an ongoing effort and is updated regularly. The map markers are currently divided into (4) categories:

Red Markers: Cider Producers. Green Markers: Stores that sells cider. Yellow Markers: Establishments or bars that serve traditional craft cider. Blue Markers: Cider Education Resources

The North American Cider Map Project also includes an alphabetical listing of cider makers and resources flagged on the map.

Last updated: January 24, 2013

To make additions to the map contact Oldtimecider.com

NACMap

 

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On The Shelf: What We’re Reading: for Presidents’ Day: Founding Gardeners by Andrea Wulf

Founding Gardeners: The Revolutionary Generation, Nature, and the Shaping of the American Nation, by Andrea Wulf

“For the Founding Fathers, gardening, agriculture, and botany were elemental passions: a conjoined interest as deeply ingrained in their characters as the battle for liberty and a belief in the greatness of their new nation.”

Read an excerpt here.

We discovered the book via  William Yosses, author, activist and White House Executive Pastry Chef, who mentioned Founding Gardeners, in his talk at TEDxManhattan:Changing the Way We Eat, which you can view along with all the inspiring TEDxManhattan speakers, here. William “Bill” Yosses speaks during Session 2: EDUCATE at about 1:45 timestamp.


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Windfalls: Found Apple Poems. Selections from The Letter B.

 
assorted apples
 
Birmingham Pippin

Brummage Pippin, Grummage Pippin

Yellow russett,

round,

table, first rate:

January to June.

A Warwickshire apple.

– – –

 
Betsey.

-Yellowish russett,

oblate,

conical, middle-sized, table,

first-rate;

November to February;

tender juicy flesh.

– – –

 
Black Crab

( Black Borsdorffer ). – Darkish red,

roundish, small,

indifferent;

curious on account of it’s colour,

in other respects worthless.

– – –

The Gardener”s Monthly Volume.

The Apple

It’s Culture, Uses, and History

1847

by George William Johnson & R. Errington

via googlebooks

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Old apple tree, we’ll wassail thee !

WinterOrchard#1

Let The Wassailing Begin.

Traditionally wassailing the orchard occurs on Twelfth Night Eve, observed according to the “new” calendar of 1752, on January 5th. Celebrants following the “old” calendar will wassail on January 17th.

We at United States of Cider have decided to wassail from now through January 17th. Embracing both the Old and New. Being urban wassailers, we may just salute the old trees at our favorite local cider establishment.

The Churchill’s Jenn Dowds shared this wassail recipe with Rosie Schaap of The New York Times. Read the article, quoted below, for a little wassail history and additional wassail mixology suggestions.

“Therein lies the beauty of wassail: more than just another nice-tasting drink, it’s part of a long (if largely forgotten) tradition of celebrating the life that winter can seem determined to snuff out. It’s a fragrant, warming concoction mixed in bulk and set out for sharing…”

Wassailing We Shall Go !

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Pomological Art: Rhode Island Greening 1916

United States of Cider is featuring images from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection.

Beautiful images, and interesting details regarding variety, location collected, and artist who created. More images posted on tumblr.

Attribution: “U.S. Department of Agriculture Pomological Watercolor Collection. Rare and Special Collections, National Agricultural Library, Beltsville, MD 20705”

Rhode Island Greening

Malus domestica: Rhode Island Greening

Artist: Steadman, Royal Charles, b. 1875
Scientific name: Malus domestica
Common name: apples
Variety: Rhode Island Greening
Physical description: 1 art original : col. ; 17 x 25 cm.
Specimen: 88085
Year: 1916
Notes on original: Apple purchased in market
Date created: 1916-03-30
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