gone so long

We’ve been gone so long – like a cider Rip Van Winkle. We are back. We are in the Pacific Northwest. Cascadia based (Seattle adjacent) and we are looking to find out – What’s been going on. Cider is everywhere. Time to explore*. Hello Cider!

(*and do some site housekeeping to fix broken links and content)

What We’re Reading: Uncultivated Wild Apples, Real Cider, and the Complicated Art of Making a Living by Andy Brennan

Andy Brennan of Aaron Burr Cider wrote a book – Uncultivated Wild Apples, Real Cider, and the Complicated Art of Making a Living.

From Chelsea Green Publishing:

“The hero of this book is the wild apple. Uncultivated follows Brennan’s twenty-four-year history with naturalized trees and shows how they have guided him toward successes in agriculture, in the art of cider making, and in creating a small-farm business. The book contains useful information relevant to those particular fields, but is designed to connect the wild to a far greater audience, skillfully blending cultural criticism with a food activist’s agenda.”

Here are links to some additional information about Andy, Aaron Burr Cider, wild apples and real ciders:

About Aaron Burr CiderAaron Burr Cider’s Cider 101

Eric Asimov in The New York Times
A New Golden Age for Cider Production in New York

Rowan Jacobsen in Tasting Table
The Feral Cider Society: Looking for the Future of American Cider on the Side of the Road

On Thanksgiving Traditions In The Colony of New Haven.

 

Colliers Thanksgiving Cover 1901

“Thanksgiving was celebrated with the greatest profusion. For three days previous all was bustle and preparation: the stalled ox was killed, – turkeys, hens, and geese innumerable shared the fate of Charles the first, – a load of the best walnut wood was drawn for the thanksgiving fires, a barrel of the best cider was chosen, the best pumpkins were selected for pies, (to supply the place of minced,)* and strong water was provided in moderation to assist the inspiration of the joyful occasion.”

* “It has been said that minced pies were proscribed from the bill of fare of the Puritans because they were customarily made by the Episcopalians on Christmas.”

Page: 191

From: History of the colony of New Haven: before and after the union with Connecticut. Containing a particular description of the towns which composed that government, viz., New Haven, Milford, Guilford, Branford, Stamford, & Southold, L. I., with a notice of the towns which have been set off from “the original six.” 

Author: Edward Rodolphus Lambert Publisher: Hitchcock & Stafford, 1838 – Branford (Conn.)

via: google ebook

Image: Creator(s): Penfield, Edward, 1866-1925, artist. Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, reproduction number LC-USZC4-1206 (color film copy transparency)

From the archives: November 2014.

 

1899: Vintage Herefordshire Apples, and “French sorts”

Rackham Pomona

A committee composed of members of the Herefordshire Fruit-Growers’ Association and of the Fruit and Chrysanthemum Society was appointed in 1899 to make a selection of vintage apples and pears best suited to Herefordshire and the districts adjoining.

The following is the list drawn up by the committee:

The Apples:

Old Foxwhelp 
Cherry Pearmain
Cowarne Red
Dymock Red
Eggleton Styre
Kingston Black or Black Taunton
Skyrme’s Kernel
Spreading Redstreak
Carrion Apple
Cherry Norman
Cummy Norman
Royal Wilding
Handsome Norman
Strawberry Norman
White Bache or Norman
Broad-leaved Norman
 
and
 
Argile Grise
Bramtot
De Boutville
Frequin Audievre
Medaille d’Or
 
These last five being “French sorts” introduced from Normandy about 1880, and now established in the orchards of Herefordshire.

Adapted from an online version of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica – Article: CIDER, or CYDER (from the Fr. cidre, derived from the Lat. sicera or cisera, Gr. mucepa, Heb. shade, strong drink)

Read more here: CIDER, or CYDER 

Apples Stories : Apples of North America by Tom Burford

Apples of North America: 192 Exceptional Varieties for Gardeners, Growers and Cooks by Tom Burford.

Truly an essential resource for anyone interested in learning more about America’s national fruit.

It’s handy to have handy – as a quick reference when we encounter new and unknown apples, when eating in-hand or while cider sampling. What is this apples history, how was it named, where is it from, can I bake with it, what is it’s flavor profile? So many questions, and Mr. Burford has the answer to 192 varieties.

Just flip through the pages to learn about the vast diversity of apples still available, if we only seek them out.

 

Timberpress.com

Preview the book here via Google and Timber Press.

Read more about Tom Burford here:

Professor Apple: How Tom Burford sowed the seeds of the Virginia hard cider revival. by Giles Morris, 2009